Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

WHMI 93.5 FM Radio Station for Livingston County Michigan with News, Traffic, and Weather Service for Howell and Brighton

older | 1 | .... | 678 | 679 | (Page 680) | 681 | 682 | .... | 767 | newer

    0 0

    Despite filing months ago, a local lawmaker has publicly confirmed he is seeking re-election to the state legislature. Republican State Rep. Hank Vaupel of Fowlerville is a second-term lawmaker who currently serves as chairman of the House Health Policy Committee. Although he officially filed for re-election January 29th to the 47th District seat, on Monday he formally announced his intent to seek a third term. Vaupel, a veterinarian for over 40 years, was also previously the Handy Township supervisor. As a state representative, he has advanced legislation to combat the state's rising opioid crisis, improve mental health care, and increase access to resources for parents of children with spina Bifida. Vaupel said he was proud of what had been accomplished in his first two terms, and intended to work hard to represent the interests of his, “friends and neighbors in Livingston County." He also noted the fact that during his time as state representative, he has invited community members to join him for local office hours three times a month every month, without fail, saying that the most important thing he can do is, “…listen to the people who elected (him) to stand up for their interests” and he would continue that practice if entrusted with a third term. Vaupel is being challenged by Marion Township Democrat Colleen Turk. (JK)

    0 0

    The Fowlerville Village Council is still looking to fill a vacancy. The Village Council holds regular meetings every other Monday beginning at 7:30pm, with other meetings held as necessary. A vacancy was created with the resignation of Trustee Everett DeGrush. The Village published required notices seeking applications to fill the seat the vacancy through November 20th, 2018. Two applications were received from Mary Helfmann and James Mayhew. Village Clerk/Manager Kathryn Arledge says when James Mayhew discovered that there were only two applicants; he respectfully withdrew his application indicating Helfmann was the best candidate for the position. Helfmann previously served on Council and is known throughout the community for her work related to Fowlerville’s 4th of July fireworks festivities. At the Village Council meeting Monday night, Trustee Jerry Bell made a motion to extend the process of accepting applications, which was seconded by Trustee Kathryn Heath. The vote was 3-2, with one council member absent. Those opposed were President Carol Hill and Trustee Ken Bielous, who wanted to appoint Mary Helfmann Monday night but that motion failed. As a result, applications are again being accepted. Any Village resident interested in filling the seat should submit a letter of interest and application to Arledge by April 30th. Applications can be picked up between 8am and 5pn, Monday through Friday, at the Village of Fowlerville Offices or online at www.fowlerville.org. The link is posted. The letters and applications should be made to The Village of Fowlerville, Attention: Kathryn Arledge, Clerk/Manager, 213 South Grand Avenue, Fowlerville, MI 48836 or e-mail karledge@fowlerville.org. (JM)

    0 0

    Conway Township officials have pushed their high-speed internet ballot proposal from August to November because of a changing proposed millage rate. At Tuesday night’s regular meeting, the Conway Township Board of Trustees began, by some accounts, ready to pass ballot language for bringing fiber-optic cable to the township for residents to vote on in August. At last week’s meeting of the Internet Advisory Committee, the public was told to expect the millage to pay off the needed bond proposal for the project to be around 2.517 mils. The prepared proposal Tuesday night, however, was more than a full mil greater, at 3.5395 mils. Township Bond Counselor Jeff Aronoff spoke that it was important to point out that voters are not voting on a millage proposal, but a bond proposal. Aronoff said this new number is made of the most conservative assumptions they could make and assumes that the bond will not be tax-exempt. He said that voters need to know what the number will be around, but also that it can change. Being upfront and having it change between this week and last is ultimately better than changing it later, so that there is a consistent estimate locked in between now and when the vote takes place. But, he says, that number is still just an estimate. Conway officials are prepared to bond for an amount not to exceed $5.7-million. Trustee Larry Parsons said he had a “real problem” with the motion, as it was a “far cry” from what they told they told the public a week ago in terms of millage. He stated it was not their intention to mislead the public. Trustee Rick Kreeger agreed, and said it would be better placed on the November ballot where more people would vote on it. Supervisor Michael Rife said he too would be happier with a November election because these numbers weren’t the same. The cost of the project could change as a USDA grant is in the process of being completed. Officials won’t know if they are receiving money for another 4 to 10 months, which is not enough time to affect the language for either the August or November ballot. Clerk Todd Anderson and Treasurer Debra Grubb believed because of this they should stay on the August timeline. The Board voted against this 3-2, and then voted to prepare new language for a November ballot, to be presented at a future meeting. (MK)

    0 0

    An area nonprofit that trains rescue dogs to serve military veterans is the recipient of an award that celebrates contributions to animals’ well-being. Representatives from the Animal Law Section of the State Bar of Michigan recognized Stiggy’s Dogs with a ceremony held Tuesday at their training facility in Hamburg Township. Program leaders were presented with the Animal Law Section’s Sadie Award, which acknowledges Michigan residents or groups not involved in the legal or legislative system that work within the community to ensure the well-being of animals. The Sadie Award was created in 2001 and named in memory of a family pet that died as the result of animal cruelty. Sadie, a rescue, trained through Stiggy's STaR Program at Thumb Correctional Facility. Sadie was also Michigan's first live-in prison therapy dog. Stiggy’s rescues shelter dogs, who are then trained and deployed at no cost to veterans living with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and traumatic brain injury. Allen Melick is one of the program’s veterans and says his service dog, Mickey, has helped him live more independently. Melick says through the program, he's gained a sense of purpose and more confidence. He says he's able to do things on his own without having to be on guard, as Mickey is trained to lookout for him. Stiggy’s was nominated for the Sadie Award by Stephanie Olsen, Council Member for the Animal Law Section. In a letter to the State Bar, Olsen bases her reason for nominating the group on partnerships with animal shelters and the Thumb Correctional Facility, their efforts to better the lives of local veterans and their families, and how they’ve challenged the negative attitude some have developed toward shelter dogs regarding their capabilities. Olsen has seen firsthand what the nonprofit can accomplish. Olsen fostered a German Shepherd named Eddy, who was transferred from the Michigan Humane Society in 2013 to Stiggy's. Eddy is now a trained service dog for marine veteran Chris Bullion. Jennifer Petre, Founder of Stiggy’s Dogs, says it takes a village and many partners to achieve what the organization has been able to in a short amount of time. Petre says the award means so much because it acknowledges their work in giving back to the veteran and animal community. Petre started Stiggy’s Dogs from the ground up approximately seven years ago in memory of her nephew, Benjamin “Doc Stiggy” Castiglione, a Navy Corpsman who was killed in Afghanistan in 2009. Castiglione is said to have dedicated his life to preserving and improving the physical and emotional health of the Marines serving in his unit. He is remembered by his family for his caring nature and love of family and dogs. (DK)

    0 0

    Officials for the Village of Milford are hoping to soon solidify the design and budget for improvements to Central Park. The municipality’s Parks and Recreation Commission recently decided on what amenities they’d most like to see incorporated into the park’s final design. After much discussion, commissioners chose pedestrian walk-ways into the park, canoe and kayak access along the river, and reconfiguration of parking and the park’s entrance as their “must-haves”. Township Manager Christian Wuerth says the plan overall had a number of different phases that were broken up based on their elements and geographic proximity. Wuerth says it "made sense" for one of the phases’ to include improvements to the park’s entrance and green space, while the reconfiguration of the athletic courts and parking will be carried out together. The improvements to Central Park are part of its master plan that was approved in 2015. Wuerth says the project’s design and budget need to be nailed down so they can begin to allocate funds and obtain the necessary permits. (DK)

    0 0

    Tobacco users hoping to quit are being offered extra help from the Michigan Department of Health & Human Services. Since its inception in 2003, the Michigan Tobacco Quitline has received over 100,000 calls from residents hoping to break their addiction to nicotine. Now, through May 31st, they are expanding their services to better help those wanting to quit smoking or chewing tobacco. During this time, new enrollees to the nicotine replacement therapy program will be offered a free 2-week supply of nicotine gum, patches, or lozenges. While the Quitline will help callers of all ages, those seeking to enter this program must be at least 18 years of age and meet basic health requirements. Upon signing up, they will be assigned a coach to help them kick their habit. Michigan Department of Health & Human Services Spokeswoman Lynn Suftin said that quitting isn’t easy and that this extra help can make a big difference. She said that smokers who use the Quitline and accept their assistance and coaching increase their chances of success by about 5 times over that of trying to quit “cold turkey.” The coach will call the enrollee up to 4 times and offer encouragement and support. They can answer questions, give a little education, and even provide a bit of monitoring. If they see things aren’t going well, the coach can also provide the enrollee with other avenues to help them quit. The Michigan Tobacco Quitline offers around-the-clock with English, Arabic, and Spanish-speaking counselors. Interpretive services for other languages are also available. It can be reached by calling 1-800-QUIT-NOW. More information is also available online through the link below. (MK)

    0 0

    New charges have been filed against a Fenton Township man previously jailed for the alleged ongoing sexual assault of a child. 53-year-old Michael Sackrider was arrested on March 26th and charged with five counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct and one count of second-degree criminal sexual conduct. The Genesee County Sheriff’s Office says they were initially contacted about the incidents in January. The alleged victim told investigators Sackrider, who was her mother’s ex-boyfriend, sexually assaulted her several times at his Linden Road home from 2006 through 2015 when she was between the ages of 11 and 16. Now court records indicate two new charges were filed April 11th in Genesee County District Court against Sackrider for a felony count of third-degree CSC and fourth-degree CSC, both with an incapacitated victim. Officials say the incident prompting the new charges took place in July 2017. Sackrider has since been released from custody after posting bond, but is required to wear an electronic tether. A probable cause conference on the new charges has been scheduled for April 26th. (JK)

    0 0

    A local lawmaker has testified on behalf of setting consent requirements for invasive medical procedures in minors. State Representative Lana Theis of Brighton submitted testimony Tuesday to the Michigan House Law and Justice Committee on the need to prohibit procedures involving pelvic area penetration of minors without meeting certain conditions. Theis’ bill is part of a bipartisan, 17-bill reform plan following the aftermath of the recent Larry Nassar scandal. The new legislation, if passed, requires 3 conditions to be met before such a procedure on a minor is allowed to continue. The first is that the medical treatment must be within the professional’s scope of practice. Secondly, it requires that another health care professional is in the room during the procedure. Thirdly, written consent on a standardized form by a person legally allowed to give it, such as the child’s parent, must be obtained. This bill does allow for exceptions such as medical emergencies or services relating to the minor’s gynecological or reproductive health. Theis said in a statement that while most doctors have the best intentions in treating their patients, that which happened with Nassar must never occur again. House Bill 5793 has been assigned to the House Law and Justice Committee. (MK)

    0 0

    Congressman Mike Bishop escorted a constituent Wednesday to a White House meeting. During Autism Awareness Month, the 8th District Republican joined Lansing resident and autism advocate, Xavier DeGroat at the White House for a meeting with Vice President Mike Pence. DeGroat is the founder and CEO of the Xavier DeGroat Autism Foundation, a 501c3 organization established to support individuals living with autism. Bishop called Xavier “a remarkable young man” who shared his story with Pence, “along with his hopes to educate individuals to focus on the ability, not the disability.” DeGroat said that throughout his early life he had doctors and professionals tell his family that because he had autism he wasn't going to succeed, but that made him “very motivated to disprove any doubters . . . and fight for autism awareness as an advocate,” adding that as he organizes movements, food outings with his dad, and do charity donations to Habitat for Humanity for low-income autistic individuals, he hopes to share his journey and networking with leaders in a story called ‘Autism Adventures’ and that he wants to show that, “people with autism can be their own leaders.” The Vice President later Tweeted about the meeting, calling Xavier, “a courageous advocate for autism awareness and all Americans with disabilities.” (JK)

    0 0

    A piece of a meteorite discovered in Livingston County had a less than stellar landing at auction. Ashley Moritz of Royal Oak and her partner Christopher Rodgers found the meteorite on Zukey Lake in Hamburg Township four days after the January 16th incident. NASA scientists said the 6-foot-wide meteor broke apart about 20 miles over Michigan and parts of Livingston County. The meteorite Mortiz found weighed just under two ounces and was on display at Rockefeller Center in New York City. It was part of an auction at Christie’s of London entitled "Sculpted by Nature: Fossils, Minerals and Meteorites" that took place April 10th through the 17th. Moritz’s find had an opening bid of $12,000. It failed to get a single bid. Moritz told MLive.com it was kind of a big disappointment and she was surprised, based on everything people told her. She had plans to invest the money in her business but will now switch gears and is hoping to sell it through some other means. Regardless, Mortiz said the whole experience was a lot of fun. (JM)

    0 0

    Putnam Township officials have put their police contract out to bid. At Wednesday night’s regular meeting, the Putnam Township Board of Trustees had on their agenda the possible approval of a new 3-year contract with the Livingston County Sheriff’s Department. During the public comment portion beforehand, however, Pinckney Village Council President Linda Lavey asked the Board to consider letting the Village police force bid on the contract. Sheriff Mike Murphy later presented his department’s contract for approval. Under it, the first year of service would be for $98,530, which is 5.67% down from the current year. It would then raise by about 3.5% each of the next 2, meaning next year’s total is still less than this year’s. With nearly a third of the township’s population living in the Village, nearly all board members spoke about owing it to those residents to give the Village police department the opportunity to make a bid. All seemed satisfied with the level of service they have received from the both the Sheriff’s Department, currently, and Pinkney Police Department when they had the contract in the past. In discussion, some were concerned, ethically, about the Pinckney force knowing the Sheriff’s Department’s bid. Murphy said his numbers were his numbers and they wouldn’t change. Putnam Township Supervisor Dennis Brennan said what they will really be looking at is a service issue anyway. Currently the township gets 40 hours of service a week from the Sheriff’s Department, and also has access to all their services, like detectives and SWAT, that the smaller Pinckney force doesn’t have. Brennan said he was very satisfied with the response times he’s seen with regards to Putnam residents. The contract wasn’t put out to bid originally because the Township wasn’t under obligation to do so if they felt the current contract holder was giving them a fair price, which the Supervisor said he believed they did. The Board still felt that with enough time left on the existing contract, it couldn’t hurt to see what the Pinckney Police Department could offer. Murphy said he is not taking the Village’s request personally, stating it’s not an “us versus them” thing. He said that all of the police agencies in the county have an extremely good relationship with one another, and that he doesn’t blame Putnam officials for doing their due diligence. The Board voted unanimously to give the Pinckney Police Department an opportunity to submit a bid for the contract, and will vote on it next month. The current police contract ends June 30th. (MK)

    0 0

    A former Brighton woman charged with accepting donations through a bogus online fundraising account has been bound over for trial. 33-year-old Candace Ann Streng appeared for a probable cause conference Tuesday, at which time a judge determined there was enough evidence to send her case to Livingston County Circuit Court. Streng is charged with False Pretenses of $20,000 or More, a 15 year felony and Use of a Computer to Commit a Crime, a 10 year felony. The charges were the result of the Brighton Police Department’s investigation into allegations that Streng falsely claimed to have cancer and was collecting donations to help with her medical expenses. The department in January began looking into allegations of a fraudulent GoFundMe account called “Candace Kicks Cancer”, which had been set up for Streng. Brighton Police previously said there was enough information from independent sources to strongly suggest the account was fraudulently used to accept donations based on Streng’s claim to have stage four breast cancer. GoFundMe records show 399 people donated money totaling $31,645 since April 15th, 2017. Several fundraisers were held for Streng over the past year with friends rallying by her side. GoFundMe immediately closed the account, banned Streng, and worked with the Brighton Police Department to refund all the donors. Future court dates for Streng have not been set at this time. (JK/DK)

    0 0

    Three events this month aim to increase awareness about the myths and misconceptions surrounding sexual assault. The LACASA Center helps victims of interpersonal violence and provides educational programs to increase community awareness. The local non-profit is inviting the public to take part in three different events this month to generate informed community conversation and awareness. LACASA’s 20th annual Clothesline Project is currently underway at all six Livingston County libraries, as well as LACASA, for the entire month. It features t-shirts created by local abuse and assault victims, allowing them to tell their stories and experiences through art and powerful messages. Wednesday, April 25th marks Denim Day, another awareness event about consent and victim blaming started in 1998 as a response to a rape conviction overturned at the Italian Supreme Court. LACASA is encouraging area residents, businesses and organizations to join in Denim Day activities, an international day of activism, and wear jeans to raise awareness. The final event is a free community forum titled “#MeToo HERE TOO” at 7pm Friday, April 27th at the Historic Howell Theater. In the age of the “Me Too” movement, LACASA Community Education Director Nicole Matthews-Creech says its important more now than ever to come together as a community and have conversations but they also need to make sure people are informed when they do have those talks. She tells WHMI while many have heard about the movement, it’s really been more focused on Hollywood, celebrities and the political realm. She says they are now hearing from everyday people and want to recognize it’s not just in the news, but here too. Another piece to the event is understanding the context of consent but also the definition and concept of sexual assault, which is much broader than many people think. Matthews-Creech says it’s beneficial to have the conversations but at a level everyone feels comfortable with and they plan to educate the community through the multi-media presentation, some video clips, an expert panel and also generalized community conversation so they can be educated and informed, and know what to say in different situations. Details about the different events and different ways to get involved can be found through the provided link. (JM)

    0 0

    One of 25 statewide parties planned for the hoped-for retirement of a controversial oil pipeline is set in Pinkney next week. The event, which will be held Monday the 23rd, is hoping to bring awareness to the aging 65 year old Line 5 pipeline that carries 22-and a half million gallons of oil underneath the Straits of Mackinac daily. Pinckney resident and environmental activist Terri Wilkerson is organizing the local event. "Those pipelines are 65 years old this month and they are in the worst spot they could possible be in the Great Lakes because the amount of water that goes back and forth between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron is ten times the volume of water that goes over Niagara Falls each day and it reverses direction every few days." The 645-mile long pipeline crosses 23 counties and 360 waterways in Michigan and is owned by Enbridge, the same company responsible for nearly a million gallons of oil spilling into the Kalamazoo River back in July of 2010. However, Enbridge officials have repeatedly insisted the lines are safe and points to an independent review by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration of the company's inspection data on Line 5, which, "concluded that the Line 5 Straits crossing is safe and fit for purpose." Despite that, Wilkerson and a number of others want to see the state put an end to Line 5 permanently, saying that Enbridge was granted an easement by the state in 1953 to cross the Straits, but that it is subject to "the public trust." Opponents of the pipeline say that Enbridge has repeatedly fallen short of that standard with shoddy maintenance, concealment of damaging information and a track record of failure. The Line 5 Retirement party is being held in Wilkerson’s home next Monday between 6 and 8pm. RSVP is required by either calling her at (734) 355-7799‬ or emailing her at terri@a3homes.com Picture courtesy of National Wildlife Federation. (JK)

    0 0

    A special award winning presentation aimed at educating and preventing drug use by minors is coming to Brighton. Tall Cop Says Stop is the program created by 6-foot-9-inch police officer Jermaine Galloway who is regarded as an expert in evolving drug and alcohol trends. Believing that “You can’t stop what you don’t know,” Galloway has made it his mission to educate and train others to help fight against substance abuse across the country. On Thursday, May 24th, program instructor and trainer Ryan “Buzz” Buzzini will be at 2|42 Church in Brighton from 9am until 3pm to hold the event. Buzzini has served in law enforcement for 29 years, including 15 as a police officer. He is a qualified Drug Recognition Expert Instructor who is trained in the signs and symptoms of legal and illegal drug use. Buzzini has also served on the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force and is a DEA Task Force member focusing on fraudulent prescription pill abuse. At the event he will share his expertise on the rise and widespread usage of designer drugs, opioids, herbal drugs, and marijuana. Buzzini will also educate on drug trafficking, street level usage, and the associated items used and involved within the drug user’s culture. This event is free and open to everyone, but registration is required. For more information, contact Megan Palmer at (517) 545-5944. To register, visit www.bit.ly/livcotallcop. (logo- Jermaine Galloway YouTube) (MK)

    0 0

    The City of Brighton is hosting two weekend celebrations. The City will host its second annual Mill Pond Clean Up event Saturday at 9am and volunteers of all ages are being sought to help beautify the area. Volunteers are encouraged to bring yard tools if possible. After the clean-up, the City will host its 15th annual Arbor Day celebration on Saturday, at 2:30pm. The ceremony will be held on the City Hall site, adjacent to the Imagination Station playground at 200 North First Street. A tree will be planted and the Arbor Day Proclamation will be read. The City is encouraging members of the public to attend. (JM)

    0 0

    Plans to rezone part of Hartland Towne Square in order to develop residential units on the property have received general support from municipality officials. Hartland Township’s Board of Trustees met Tuesday and offered input on RAMCO Gershenson’s proposal to rezone 20 acres within the development located off of M-59, adjacent to US-23. The quadrant in question, between Hartland Road and Meijer, would change from a commercial zoning to multiple family residential if Ramco applies and receives approval. The new zoning would allow residential units to be constructed on the space, which would likely be carried out by Redwood Apartment Homes. Ramco Senior Vice President of Development, Edward Eickhoff, says there’s currently a trend in the retail/commercial market to focus on more densely populated, regionally-dominant areas, prompting Ramco to begin exploring rezoning and living space within Hartland Towne Square. The company has owned the development since 2006 and Eickoff says that trend became apparent post-recession. Eickoff says, “While Hartland Township is a great community and has a long-term future, it will be awhile before retailers look at the municipality as one of those regionally-dominant areas.” The majority of township officials have generally supported the concept, but noted they will be very particular about the residential development’s appearance due to its proximity to US-23. A number of township officials weren’t impressed by examples of Redwood’s work submitted with the concept review, nor do they like the look of the company’s development on Latson Road in Oceola Township. Richard Batt, Redwood’s Senior Vice President of Acquisition and Development, says the company typically develops single-story, ranch-style rental homes. Preliminary plans drawn up by Redwood propose 140 units, each of which is estimated to cost between $1,500 and $2,000 per month. (DK)

    0 0

    Howell High School Principal Jason Schrock was chosen as the 2018 award winner by the Michigan Association of Secondary School Principals (MASSP). The association says the annual award recognizes “the best of the best” among educational administrators for their outstanding school leadership. Schrock has served Howell High School for nearly 20 years, six of which were at its helm as principal. He received almost 30 letters supporting his nomination for the award. The nomination packet described Schrock as “a true instructional leader…who works to empower teachers to be facilitators, leaders and coaches, while also creating a student-centered learning environment where all stakeholders feel empowered to take ownership of their education”. He will be honored at an MASSP conference June 25th. In addition to the statewide honor, Schrock was chosen as Michigan's nominee for the National Principal of the Year competition through the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). Each of the 50 states, along with several other agencies, select one middle level or high school principal to represent their state. From the state winners, three finalists are named as contenders for the National Principal of the Year award. Schrock will attend the NASSP Principals Institute in Washington, DC in September and vie for the national award, which is announced during National Principals Month in October. Twitter photo.

    0 0

    The roof at Brighton’s city hall again came under discussion at the City Council meeting Thursday night. The city had previously approved a minimum of $58,000 and a maximum of $126,000 for the work. How much the project will cost all depends on the extent of deterioration to the flat roof – a kind that is particularly prone to problems due to water collecting on its flat surface. City DPW Director Marcel Goch (GAHCH) tells WHMI that there has been a change from the original scope of work due to the atrium, which was not part of the original city hall when it was first constructed. Goch says the roofing project will be done this spring. Royal-West Roofing and Sheet Metal of Brighton has been awarded the contract at a cost “not to exceed” $126,000. The funds for the project will come out of the city’s capital outlay budget. (TT)

    0 0

    The medical examiner’s position in Livingston County may soon be drawn from a larger candidate pool. The Office of the Medical Examiner is mandated under state statute to investigate certain types of death, with the authority to order an autopsy to determine or confirm the cause and manner of death. Currently the county has a team of examiners providing the service using an on-call rotation to provide 24/7 coverage. They are led by Dr. Joyce L. DeJong, who chairs the Pathology Department at Western Michigan University and served for 15 years as head of Pathology at Sparrow Hospital in Lansing. But officials say there has been decreased interest when it comes to working as many shifts as the four-member team has in the past, while some are nearing retirement. By pooling the position, it’s hoped they can spread the work over more people and increase efficiency. It would also allow the county to continue to keep the cost low and provide the service level required to maintain adequate coverage. During Monday night’s General Government & Health and Human Services Committee meeting, officials said the pay remains the same since only one person is working on-call at a time; there is just the need for a larger pool of medical examiners to draw from. The request will go before the full Livingston County Board of Commissioners at a future meeting. (JM/JK)

older | 1 | .... | 678 | 679 | (Page 680) | 681 | 682 | .... | 767 | newer