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WHMI 93.5 FM Radio Station for Livingston County Michigan with News, Traffic, and Weather Service for Howell and Brighton

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    A lane closure is planned on US-23 in Livingston County later this week, resulting in potential delays. The Michigan Department of Transportation advises that northbound US-23 will be closed between Crouse Road and Clyde Road on Thursday, from 4am to 2pm. The lane closure is needed to accommodate patch work and motorists are advised to travel with caution in the area. As with all construction, M-DOT says the work is weather dependent. (JM)

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    Local authorities say a Pinckney man was killed in a crash in Gregory Monday afternoon. The Unadilla Township Police Department is investigating a fatal crash and vehicle fire involving a van that struck a tree on Unadilla Road in Gregory around 4:30pm. Unadilla Road was subsequently shut down to traffic at Doyle Road as well as Church Street during the evening rush hour. Police say a male believed to be the driver and sole occupant of the vehicle has been identified as a 62-year-old resident of Pinckney and that his family has been notified. They did not release the man's name. The cause of the crash remains under investigation. The Unadilla Township Police Department was assisted on scene by the Unadilla Township Fire Department as well as crash investigators from the Livingston County Sheriff’s Office and the Hamburg Township Police Department. Anyone who witnessed the crash is asked to contact the Unadilla Township Police Department at 734-498-2325 or police@unadillapolice.org. (JM)

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    A former Livingston County commissioner is seeking a seat on the board again. Republican Steve Williams of Marion Township says he’s kicked off his election campaign with a focused intent: to fix what many residents say is wrong with the current state of county government. The decorated Army veteran is a Pinckney Community Schools graduate. Williams says in talking with many county residents, some are unhappy with the direction the Board of Commissioners has been headed, so he decided to act. Williams says his main goals include local government serving the public, filling open positions with the most qualified people, a friendlier county court system, use of frugal and appropriate purchasing policies, and Commissioners willing to meet with the public and hear their concerns. More details about Williams’ experience and policy positions are available through his Facebook page and website, as well as the attached press release. Williams is challenging incumbent and former Livingston County Sheriff Bob Bezotte, who has filed for re-election. Democrat Kasey Helton has also filed for the District 6 seat. (JM)

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    City of Brighton officials are inviting discussion with residents over their current plan for fixing the city’s failing road system. Because of the Headlee Amendment and certain criteria that can trigger its millage rollbacks, the City of Brighton is only levying around 15.65-mills out of the 20 authorized by city charter. With Proposition A slowing the rate at which property values can raise, some communities in the area, like Brighton, have continued to struggle with raising revenues post-recession. One of the areas hit hardest by this in Brighton is the street system. A recent review by the city’s engineer rated the roads at a 48 out of 100. City Council has come to decision to ask voters for an override of the Headlee Amendment on August 7th. If passed, they would be able to draw the extra 4.35-mills from taxpayers with the funds going explicitly towards creating a comprehensive streets program. Broken down, a resident with taxable home valued at $75,000 would owe an extra $326 per year in city taxes, or 89-cents per day. DPW Director Marcel Goch said that the $1.85-million this raises yearly will help fix not only worst, but keep the roads in good condition that way for longer. He compared it preventative maintenance on a car, saying that if you spend more money on the front end, you’ll get more out of it in the long run. Brighton’s problem is that it will be difficult to get back to where they need to be for maintaining. Goch estimates that the city needs between $40-$50million to get to where they need to be. Mayor Jim Muzzin said that City Council is out of other options with roads. They began with no end date to the override, but upon listening to residents, Muzzin said they capped it at 10 years. He hopes residents will give them a chance to see where 10 years gets the city, and based on the results, vote again. He assures voters that the tax dollars will stay local and for roads- they will not be sent to schools, the county, the state, or the federal government. Councilman Jon Emaus said that City Council has reached a point where they can’t cut the budget any further and continue to give residents the services they’ve come to expect on the path they are currently on. He noted that on the upcoming budget the allocated money for roads is only $35,000. Emaus said that they simply don’t have the funds with the loss of revenue sharing and the loss of money coming in from Headlee and Proposition A. While not being something that City Council jumped at to put on the ballot, Emaus said it is the most fiscally responsible solution they have for maintaining quality roads and a quality community. City Manager Nate Geinzer reported that almost 75% of neighborhood roads are in poor condition. He called it “simple math” with the money to fix the streets simply not being there. Geinzer said the goal is not to fix everything at one point, as it would all need to be repaired again at the same time in the future. He said the real goal is to get to a comprehensive streets program, so that they can fix the roads that need to be fixed, while preventing other roads from slipping into poor condition. At a public open house earlier this month, they had displays laying out ideas for breaking the 10-year override into a series of smaller 2-year plans. City Council has three more public open houses coming up. Attendees will get to spend time with elected officials and others involved like Goch and Geinzer to share opinions and ideas. The next one is scheduled for tonight from 6pm until 8pm at City Hall. More information can be found online through the link below. To hear more of the discussion with Muzzin, Emaus, Geinzer, and Goch, tune into WHMI’s Viewpoint, this Sunday morning at 8:30am.

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    The American Legion Devereaux Post 141 is seeking approval from Howell Township for a billboard on their property; however a number of issues have come up throughout the process that Legion members and supporters are questioning. About 40 community members attended the township Planning Commission’s Tuesday meeting to voice support for the proposed electronic billboard on the Legion’s site at M-59 and Grand River. The Legion says the billboard would provide a source of revenue that the nonprofit needs to stay afloat down the road. The Legion first applied in January of 2017, but planning commissioners say they didn’t hear about it until this past March. That was right around the time that the Board of Trustees adopted a moratorium for 120 days, which temporarily halted any sign or billboard approvals. Township officials say the intent was to freeze any approvals until they had amended their “outdated” sign ordinance. A public hearing regarding some proposed amendments was held at the commission’s Tuesday meeting, at which time a number of attendees shared concerns and asked questions about various issues surrounding the application process and new ordinance. If the suggested changes to the ordinance were adopted, the Legion’s billboard as currently proposed would not be permitted. Some have accused township officials of putting a moratorium in place before the Legion’s application could complete the process in an attempt to prevent the billboard. Legion members say their site plans for the sign should be held to the original ordinance’s standards, instead of the new regulations being retroactively applied to the plans that were submitted prior to their adoption. Several attendees said if held to the new standards, the township should consider making an exception because the legion is a nonprofit veterans’ organization. Legion members and supporters also want to know why the application process took so long and why the Planning Commission hadn’t heard about it until March of 2018, when the moratorium was already in place. Township officials say they need to meet with legal counsel to get further clarification before they can answer any of those questions. Officials can’t take action on the Legion’s application until the moratorium lifts in approximately two weeks. The township’s board will meet before then on July 9th and the Planning Commission will next meet July 24th. (DK)

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    An outside judge has been assigned to hear the request for grand jury to investigate Judge Theresa Brennan after Livingston County’s Chief Judge vacated all of the previous rulings by a local judge. Judge Miriam Cavanaugh on Monday filed an order invalidating the rulings on a motion to impanel a grand jury to investigate Brennan. Those rulings were made by Circuit Court Judge David Reader, who had been assigned the case after retired Judge Daniel Burress requested a citizen’s grand jury to look into issues surrounding Brennan’s admitted relationship with former State Police Detective Sean Furlong, who served as the chief prosecution witness in a 2013 double-murder trial that she presided over and resulted in the conviction and life sentence of Jerome Kowalski. Those actions are currently the subject of a complaint filed last month by the Judicial Tenure Commission, which charged Brennan with “a pattern of improper conduct in violation of the Code of Judicial Conduct.” In her order to vacate Judge Reader’s decisions, Judge Cavanaugh noted that on June 20th, Reader granted the petition to convene a grand jury and then appointed Howell Attorney Thomas Kizer as Special Prosecuting Attorney. However, the following day Judge Reader recused himself from hearing the case and sent it back to Cavanaugh to be reassigned. Judge Cavanaugh said because Mr. Kizer served as the attorney for Donald Root in his divorce proceeding against Theresa Brennan and because that case formed the basis of many of the allegations in the petition to convene a grand jury, Reader should have disqualified himself before making those rulings, not after. Judge Cavanaugh further referred the matter to the State Court Administrative Office to assign a judge from another county. That has now prompted Judge Burress to file his own order to vacate Judge Cavanaugh’s ruling, saying that by assigning the case to a visiting judge, Livingston County judges have been “summarily deprived of their opportunity to take the case” and further that it violates the Court’s own Administrative Order signed just six days earlier that required that each of the county’s qualified judges, in this case Circuit Court Judge Michael Hatty and District Court Judges Carol Sue Reader and Suzanne Geddis, to have a chance to hear the case. According to court documents, that opportunity was never granted. When asked, Judge Burress declined to comment on his filing, saying it spoke for itself. A request for comment to Judge Cavanaugh and Judge Reader has yet to be returned. Meanwhile, Judge Brennan’s caseload has since been reassigned, leaving her off the bench while still being paid pending the outcome of the Judicial Tenure Commission complaint, which potentially could remove her from the bench. (JK)

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    Per community tradition, two separate fireworks displays are planned this week at local Metroparks. Kensington Metropark in the Milford/Brighton area will host a show Friday, and then Hudson Mills Metropark in Dexter on Saturday. The fireworks shows are said to provide a safe and exciting way for the community to celebrate the nation’s birthday, while enjoying the natural beauty of the Metroparks. Metroparks Director Amy McMillan tells WHMI crowds are extraordinary for the fireworks shows. She says the events are part of both community and family traditions, as well as memories across generations. McMillan encourages families and visitors to arrive early to get a good spot, spend the day enjoying the various attractions and then end with the fireworks displays but remember to bring bug spray. For both events, vendors will be on site at 5pm, followed by a DJ and entertainment at 7pm. Each fireworks display will begin at dusk. A vehicle permit is required to enter any Metropark, with season and day passes available. Details are available through the provided link. (JM)

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    With two weeks having elapsed since the Brighton school board decided not to pursue a bond issue request this year, the board has had time to ponder what its next step will be. Although a final figure was never arrived at, the amount of the bond issue being bandied about the most was in the neighborhood of $45 million. The funds mostly would go toward items that were left out of the $88.5 million bond issue passed by the voters in 2012 because of the high cost. These would include new parking lots for a couple schools, new boiler units to replace aging, maintenance-prone boilers, a new roof and a STEM center at the high school. Board President Andy Burchfield tells WHMI the majority on the board felt they hadn’t had enough time to evaluate and prioritize what was really needed the most to bring the district into tip-top condition in terms of its physical facilities. Burchfield says there is what he calls a “strong likelihood” that the board will opt to go to the voters with a bond issue in 2019, although whether it would be in November or on another date is yet to be decided. He adds that it would be a bond issue, not a sinking fund, since only a limited amount of the revenue generated from sinking funds is available each year for different projects. (TT)

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    The city of Brighton has created a new position — that of community development manager — and City Manager Nate Geinzer has appointed Michael Caruso to fill the position. Caruso, a 5-year city employee who currently has the job of senior community development associate, will assume his new duties on Sunday, July 1st. Some of his new responsibilities will be the same as Matt Modrack previously had as the city’s community development director. Modrack passed away in August of 2016, and the post has been left unfilled. Modrack left an indelible mark on the community — most notably its downtown — and many have attributed the success of Brighton’s vibrant downtown to Modrack’s vision. However, Geinzer says Caruso will leave his own distinctive mark on the city and has already developed an excellent rapport with builders and residents as the city’s rental inspector, code enforcement officer and more recently, in community development. Geinzer says that city boards, commissions, and the City Council have also been highly complementary about his work. In his new duties, Caruso will be part of team consisting of himself, Geinzer, and Brandon Skopek, who is assistant to the city manager and DDA coordinator. Caruso topped a field of over a dozen applicants who were interviewed for the community development manager position by a special panel and, according to Geinzer, stood out among the candidates. Before coming to Brighton, Caruso spent 27 years in Canton Township before retiring from the position of battalion chief with the Canton Twp. Fire Dept. Caruso is married and has two daughters who attend college. (TT)

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    A new leader is being sought for a local recreation authority. Jason Spiller, who had served as director for the Southeastern Livingston County Recreation Authority, or SELCRA, has stepped down from the organization. According to SELCRA Trustee, and Green Oak Township Supervisor Mark St. Charles, Spiller accepted a position managing Camp Dearborn in Milford and its golf courses. Spiller was the third director of the organization in less than two years’ time, having come on board in January of 2017 to replace Phillip Biscorner, who served in the role for only about six months before also leaving for a new job. One of the major accomplishments achieved under Spiller’s tenure was the reopening of the Meijer Skate Park, which had been closed for several years. SELCRA also underwent a funding change last year, switching over from charging communities on a per-participant basis to an annual flat fee for its two member municipalities. Green Oak Township pays $100,000, while Brighton Township pays $150,000. Together that makes up less than half the organization’s annual revenues, with most of the rest coming from youth athletic leagues and programs. The organization has four full-time employees and four part-time employees that work out of the Brighton Educational Community Center. St. Charles says they are now advertising for applicants to fill the director’s position. (JK)

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    The Brighton Board of Education Monday night adopted a budget of $74.1 million for the 2018-19 fiscal year beginning July 1. The board also approved a revised 2017-18 budget of $72.9 million. So although enrollment is projected to be relatively flat at about 6,000 in-house students, district spending is projected to go up by $1.2 million. Superintendent Greg Gray says the extra dollars will go for such items as the purchase of buses, new school boilers, implementing the new Science curriculum and bringing in science coaches to train teachers in the new curriculum. Gray tells WHMI that due to the district being frugal in its spending, Brighton is expecting to have a nearly $5 million fund equity by the end of the current fiscal year this Saturday. Assistant Superintendent for Business and Finance Maria Gistinger says the district has enough funds safely tucked away that, even in the event of an economic downturn, its finances would continue to be in good order. Gistinger says Brighton keeps on improving its fund equity, and estimates that the 18-19 budget year starting July 1 will show a fund balance of $5.8 million by the end of the fiscal year – a nearly $1 million increase. One of the big reasons for the district’s improving finances is the Shared Services program, in which school districts can offer classes with certified teachers in non-core curriculum subject areas to private and parochial schools. Brighton receives the state aid for each student, and for the 18-19 year is expected to have 2,000 full-time equivalent Shared Services students, resulting in about $15 million in revenue and a net profit of about $2 million after paying for teachers’ salaries, classroom materials, insurance and other expenses. (TT)

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    Exchange students are set to arrive this summer from Turkey, Bulgaria and Germany to stay with several local families. Katie and Terry Philibeck of Howell will welcome two international exchange students into their home in August: Miroslav, a 17-year-old from Bulgaria, and Justin, a 16-year-old from Germany. Both will attend Howell High School. Miroslav is a Kennedy-Lugar Youth Exchange and Study (YES) scholar. Established in 2003, the scholarship is awarded to exemplary high school students from countries with significant Muslim populations to spend up to one academic year in the U.S. Also arriving next month under the same scholarship is Ozlin, a 16-year-old from Turkey who will attend Brighton High school. He will be staying with Alison and Trevor Kilgore of Brighton. The Kilgores and Philibecks were matched with their students through Youth For Understanding USA, which places hundreds of international exchange students with host families across the U.S. and enrolls them in a local area school. Miroslav and Justin will be the 13th and 14th exchange students welcomed into the Philibeck’s home since they began hosting in 2005 opening their hearts and home through the years to students from Japan, Thailand, South Korea and Germany. Katie Philibeck says they’re looking forward to forming close bonds with Miro and Justin because for them, that's what hosting is all about - welcoming students to become members of their family – adding they hope these relationships last a lifetime. (JM/JK)

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    Two suspects have been bound over for trial on charges connected to a break-in at a Hartland Township storage unit. 22-year-old Nicholas Cashero of Livonia and 19-year-old Kenneth Helbig of River Rouge are facing numerous felonies, including breaking and entering a building with intent and malicious destruction of personal property. Both men recently appeared in 53rd District Court in Howell, where Judge Carol Sue Reader determined there was enough evidence to send their case to trial, binding them over to Livingston County Circuit Court. At the probable cause conference, Helbig’s attorney asked for a reduction in his client’s $400,000 cash surety bond; however that request was denied. Future court dates for the pair have not been set at this time. Helbig and Cashero are each charged with 16 counts of breaking and entering and two counts of property destruction. The charges stem from the June 17th incident, which began when Livingston County Sheriff’s deputies responded to an alarm at Livingston Concrete on Old US-23, south of Bergin Road. While checking the alarm, deputies heard loud noises coming from Best Self Storage, which is located directly to the north. They observed two males breaking into storage units and stealing property from inside. Deputies requested additional units, which responded and converged on the suspects. Cashero was taken into custody after a minor physical altercation, which led to a count of assaulting/resisting/obstructing a police officer in addition to the aforementioned charges. Helbig fled on foot, but was apprehended during a traffic stop as he attempted to flee the area. As a result, he faces a count of unlawful driving away in a motor vehicle and possession of burglar’s tools. (JK/DK)

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    It’s out with the old and in with the new for Recycle Livingston, which recently received approval for plans to construct a new building on site. Recycle Livingston’s existing facility operates on city-owned property on Catrell Street, where a small office building and outside storage space is located. Recycle Livingston has been operating there since its inception in 1989, offering recycling opportunities to local residents. The organization approached the city last year to discuss renewing a long-term lease for the parcel. They were already working on acquiring funding to replace their original office building. The nonprofit wants to remove their current office building to construct a new one with a parking lot on site. The City of Howell’s Planning Commission approved the project site plan last week. The only concern voiced by city staff members was in regards to any potential hazardous chemicals on the property. Recycle Livingston Board President John Boris reassured the commission the organization does not have or accept hazardous chemicals on site, and has no plans to. The property, as well as those to the north, east and west, are all zoned Light-Industrial. The property to the south is zoned General Business. Recycle Livingston is surrounded by Centurion Medical Products, Peacemakers Gun Range and Grundy’s Ace Hardware. The nearest parcels with residential zoning are to the west, past Peacemakers, on National Street. (DK)

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    Cancer survivors were honored during a ceremony at the St. Joseph Mercy Brighton Cancer Center, which has a new addition to its oncology unit. The event at the Cancer Center Tuesday celebrated cancer survivors’ strength and courage in recognition of National Cancer Survivors Month. The ceremony also paid tribute to those that have lost their battle against the disease. That very well could’ve been the end result for Bill Mann, a patient who was diagnosed with stage four lung cancer just 18 months ago. Mann, who spoke during the program, says that was a very difficult time in telling his children about his bleak diagnosis. But then he was approached by a doctor who encouraged him to participate in clinical research trials. The trial drug halted the cancer’s growth, meaning that Mann will still live with cancer, though it is now controlled. Mann says he feels great and is able to enjoy and participate in physical activities again. He believes his “second chance at life is entirely due to the clinical trial drug”. Mann says it's “truly been a blessing” to be a part of the trials, turning his negative cancer experience into something positive. After the program, a ribbon-cutting ceremony with the Brighton Area Chamber of Commerce unveiled the center's new Varian True Beam Linear Accelerator. The machine can treat cancer anywhere in the body through image-guided radiotherapy and radiosurgery. Officials with St. Joseph Mercy Health System say the linear accelerator ensures local patients can receive comprehensive care close to home. It is part of the Health System’s investment into its Livingston County hospitals, which totals out to a $41 million transformation. The event also included a tour of the Radiation Oncology unit and attendees had the opportunity to learn about the center’s services, which include genetic counseling, pastoral care, and oncology social work from the system's medical experts. (DK/JK) Photo courtesy of Kelly Bergen: (Left to right) Jane Strudgeon, manager, Radiation Oncology, Saint Joseph Mercy Health System (SJMHS); Beth LaVasseur, executive director, Oncology, SJMHS; Derek Yaldo, chief medical physicist, SJMHS; Dr. George T. Henning, III, Radiation Oncology, SJMHS; John O'Malley, president, St. Joseph Mercy Livingston and Brighton; Dr. Kimberly Morley, Medical Oncology, SJMHS; and Bridgett Young, manager, outpatient nursing, Radiation Oncology, SJMHS.

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    A home invasion in Lyon Township has led to charges against a Washtenaw County man. Oakland County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a residence on Terrace Drive just after 7:15am on Sunday, June 24th, after the homeowner reported an intoxicated man had broken through her front door and smashed two windows. After yelling at the occupants of the home, the suspect fled on foot. After calling 9-1-1, the resident kept the suspect in sight until he reached Eight Mile. When deputies arrived, they spotted a man matching the description given by the homeowner who was walking in the road. Despite being highly intoxicated, the man cooperated with deputies and was later positively identified by the homeowners. 31-year-old Antonio Matthew King of Ypsilanti was taken into custody and charged with 3rd degree home invasion, He remains in the Oakland County Jail on a $100,000 cash/surety bond. A probable cause conference is set for July 11th in Novi District Court. (JK)

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    The Fenton Zoning Board of Appeals has granted a sign variance for a new fine dining restaurant. Owners and representatives for The Meeting Place went before the ZBA Tuesday night asking for the sign variance they feel they need to be able to survive and thrive. Being built at the old Bob Evans location at 3600 Owen Road, in Fenton, The Meeting Place’s legal representation argued that under the current sign ordinance, the restaurants signage would be obscured by elevation changes, tree lines, traffic, and other businesses. They were asking for a 109 square foot sign, reaching a height of 12 feet, with roughly a third being electronic. Current city ordinance allows signs to be 72 square feet and 6 feet high. Part of the sign includes an electronic portion. ZBA officials discussed, perhaps warning the owner, how the city was moving in a direction towards possibly eliminating them in a future master plan. With that still not official, however, they recognized it couldn’t impact their decision on this case. One solution the ZBA offered was to allow an additional wall sign that would be visible to westbound traffic. The owner felt that was too cost prohibitive. The ZBA, recognizing a need to help the new business, asked if the applicant could cut back their original design to 75% of the requested size. At 9 feet from the ground and 77 square feet in area, the owner believed they could make it work. The ZBA voted unanimously on the variance. The Meeting Place is looking to open up to the public in late July or early August. (MK)

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    Storage tents will no longer be allowed in resident’s front or side yards following a vote by the Linden City Council. The city’s planning commission recommended that city council adopt ordinance changes that would only allow storage tents in back yards. The issue had been delayed two weeks, while council sought an opinion from legal counsel. But the Tri-County Times reports that City Attorney Michael Gildner said the measure should be adopted, calling it, “necessary clean-up work.” The change, which was finalized at Monday's council meeting, requires temporary accessory structures to follow the same requirements as permanent accessory structures, prohibiting them from front or side yards. Previously the city had no control over the structures, but with the new ordinance officials can legally order them removed. (JK)

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    A local school district has seen a drop in chronic absenteeism, having spent the last couple of years focused on ways to boost attendance. Two years ago, 22% of the student body at Hartland High School qualified as being “chronically absent”. The national average is about 11%. Chronic absenteeism is defined as missing 15 or more days of the school year, and is tallied taking into account excused and unexcused absences, as well as suspensions. It differs from truancy, which typically refers to unexcused absences only. Hartland Superintendent Chuck Hughes says district officials and staff have been working hard to rectify the issue in recent years. At a Board of Education meeting Monday, Hughes was happy to report their efforts have been successful as they’ve seen a decrease in chronic absenteeism at every school in the district. He says thus far the high school has had the most significant reduction, dropping from 22% in 2016 to just 6% this year. Hughes says they’ve been able to achieve that by ensuring parents are notified when their student hits the chronic mark, following up with the parents, and even paying at-home visits to convey the importance of students being present. Hughes says sometimes parents don’t realize just how many days their student has missed until they’re contacted by the school. He thanked district parents for taking initiative in the solution by making sure their kids got to school, then thanked staff for "engaging students and changing the way we deliver instruction to make sure students have ownership to their learning". Attendance Works, an initiative aimed at promoting awareness regarding the importance of attendance, says chronic absenteeism has a ripple effect that goes beyond the absent student in question. A 2017 report from Attendance Works states that “all students may suffer from it because the resulting classroom churn hampers teachers’ ability to engage all students and meet their learning needs”. (DK)

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    A Fenton man has been reappointed to the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness, Health and Sports. Governor Rick Snyder announced the re-appointment of Andy Younger of Fenton to the 15-member council that works to improve lives and strengthen communities by supporting healthy eating and physical activity. In an effort to further promote healthy lifestyles, the council hosts the Governor’s Annual Fitness Awards that recognizes Michiganders who have overcome obstacles along their health and fitness journeys. Governor Snyder thanked Younger and the other individuals appointed for promoting healthier lifestyles among Michiganders, adding the work the council does helps to inspire residents to strive for a healthier life regardless of their circumstances. Younger is the race director for the Crim Fitness Foundation, where he works with staff to direct the organization’s efforts to create healthy communities through physical activity, nutrition and mindfulness. He holds a bachelor’s degree in environmental policy from the University of Michigan and a master’s degree in business administration from Loyola University. Newly appointed to the Council were Wayman Britt of Grand Rapids, Rick Ferkel of Mount Pleasant, Cameron Gordon of West Bloomfield, Andre Hutson of East Lansing and Laureen (Laurie) Rospond of DeWitt. Other reappointments included Scott Przystas of Grand Haven and Justin Zatkoff of West Bloomfield. Britt will serve the remainder of a two-year term to expire April 30, 2019. Ferkel, Gordon, Hutson, Rospond, Przystas, Younger and Zatkoff will serve two-year terms expiring April 30, 2020. Photo: Linked In.(JM)

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