Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

WHMI 93.5 FM Radio Station for Livingston County Michigan with News, Traffic, and Weather Service for Howell and Brighton

older | 1 | .... | 734 | 735 | (Page 736) | 737 | 738 | .... | 779 | newer

    0 0

    Hamburg Township has officially consolidated their police and fire department administrative offices into one. At Tuesday night’s meeting of the Board of Trustees, Hamburg Township officials voted unanimously to establish a Public Safety Administration. The recent retirement of former Fire Chief Mark Hogrebe, along with the departure of two administrative assistants gave the township the opportunity to explore how to make emergency services more efficient. Police Chief Rick Duffany and then-interim Fire Chief Nick Miller were tasked with reviewing the current structure and coming up with a model that would allow them to be more effective. Their conclusion was that a consolidation of administrative services would help deliver better service while not sacrificing the technical expertise of either department. Chief Duffany is excited to have cross-trained assistants and says they will be a benefit to the township. Where previously the respective departments had no interaction or similar job tasks, now there will be 3 assistants who can do it all. It should be noted that the Public Safety Administration in Hamburg is not a consolidation of both police and fire into a single safety department. They will remain separate and distinct. It is only the administrative functions that will be unified. Within its structure, Police Chief Duffany will lead the PSA as Director of Public Safety. He will have 2 Deputy Directors; one being Chief Miller for the Fire Department side, and Duffany’s current Deputy Chief on the Police side. The Chief of Police will never run the day-to-day activities or operational functions of the fire department. That responsibility remains exclusively with the Fire Chief.It is the belief of officials that these changes will allow the fire department to increase services on the operational side, without increasing the number of employees, or cost to residents. (MK)

    0 0

    State health officials have issued a new warning around a potentially harmful chemical found in the Huron River. The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services is advising residents to avoid swallowing foam from the Huron River, as it may contain Perfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. The primary way to get the chemical that has been used for decades in firefighting, manufacturing and common household items is ingestion. The Health Department said in a release that accidental touching or swallowing is not a health concern, but they do recommend washing hands after coming into contact with foam to keep from transferring PFAS from your hands to your mouth. Skin contact alone with the foam is not a concern as the Health Department reports that science doesn’t indicate that PFAS moves easily through skin. The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development is recommending that people not allow their pets, especially dogs, to come into contact with, or swallow, the foam. Dogs could potentially swallow foam that collects in their fur when they groom themselves. The department suggests thoroughly rinsing pets off with fresh water after contact with foamy water. The recent advisory comes on the heels of last month’s “Do Not Eat Fish” advisory for the river. Livingston County Director of Environmental Health Matt Bolang made a presentation at Monday night’s Board of Commissioners meeting on status of testing being done. 82 drinking water supplies in the county are being monitored for P-FAS as part of surveillance efforts with the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality. Bolang reported that 72 samples have been taken so far and of the 49 results to date, all came back as non-detected. Bolang said further board action would be pre-mature and while it is an issue of concern, they don’t have data to suggest there is an issue in groundwater. He says the state has been aggressive in its investigation but it’s not practical to sample every water source in the state. There is an option to privately test water sources. Sue Kelly is vice chair of the Crossroads Group of the Sierra Club. She spoke at the meeting to reiterate the importance of continuing to investigate the P-FAS situation and make sure water is safe in Livingston County. Kelly told WHMI she’s disappointed that there wasn’t more concern on the part of the board or that they felt really compelled to get out there and get water tested - especially drinking water in local wells. She says most people are on private wells and they’re not testing any of those but feels they need to know. Kelly says it’s also important to keep reminding people they should not be fishing in the Huron River or Chain of Lakes. She says caution is really important right now and encourages people to contact commissioners, the local health department or state because there are so many questions, adding people need to keep asking questions. More information on test results from the Huron River can be found through the link below. Additional information on the Eat Safe Fish guidelines can also be found at www.michigan.gov/eatsafefish (MK)

    0 0

    Repairs to a bike and walking path in Northfield Township will begin Monday. The Non-Motorized Path runs along Barker Road from Main St. to Whitmore Lake Elementary School. Officials say there are sections near the bridges where the concrete has dropped and other sections where the concrete has shifted creating trip hazards. It’s those sections that need to be torn out and replaced. One section in need of repairs is at the bridge near the railroad tracks, and the other sections are near the Elementary School. The project is expected to take approximately one week to complete, weather permitting. During that time, sections of the pathway will need to be roped off and will not be available for use until the new concrete fully cures. (jk)

    0 0

    A suspect caught on video stealing money from a farm stand is being sought by authorities. Fowlerville Police released surveillance video of a male suspect stealing money from a roadside farm stand located north of Chase Lake Road at Fowlerville Road. The stand operates on the honor system and video shows the suspect using a tool to break into the donation box. Police acknowledge the video doesn’t show much of the person's face but they ask that if members of the public notice anything in the video that reminds them of someone to contact the department at 517-223-8711. All tips will remain anonymous. (JM)

    0 0

    A Hurricane Charity Jam and supply drive will take place tomorrow as a group of local volunteers prepare to leave and aid in ongoing disaster relief efforts following Hurricane Florence. Lori O’Doherty of Oceola Township is a DRAW responder and will join a group of volunteers to help with restoration efforts. She volunteers with the non-profit DRAW or Disaster Relief at Work. The organization is dedicated to providing relief to communities that have been hit by natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes or tornadoes. Volunteers collect supplies and dedicate their time to help with whatever is needed. Five gallon buckets are filled with the supplies to meet the immediate needs of disaster survivors and passed out. This will be O’Doherty’s 5th natural disaster, as she has volunteered in the wake Hurricanes Harvey and Irma and most recently Houghton in the Upper Peninsula following massive flooding that caused historic damage. She tells WHMI after natural disasters, volunteers will go into an area and help people save their homes. Once the water recedes, O’Doherty says they’ll pull carpet, drywall and anything else to try and save a home before the mold sets in, adding a lot of people will lose their homes to mold. O’Doherty says the people they help are so appreciative and working right alongside you but there is so much need, you just want to help everybody. O’Doherty and her daughter will leave Friday with other volunteers and fly in to the Coastal Carolina Regional Airport in New Bern, North Carolina. It just resumed commercial operations Monday after five days of no airline flights. Thursday’s fundraiser and supply drive at the Howell Elks Lodge will feature a car show, food and drink specials, live music, a 50/50 raffle and a silent auction. The event runs from 6:30 to 10:30pm and donations of cash, cleaning and personal supplies will be collected. Some needed items include heavy duty trash bags, five gallon buckets and lids, latex gloves, scrub brushes and air freshener. After all of the supplies are collected, they will be taken to the DRAW headquarters and warehouse in Waterford to be divided up into personal supply buckets and cleaning buckets before being shipped to North and South Carolina. Donations can be dropped off any time after 3pm at the Howell Elks Lodge on Grand River. Financial donations can be made online through the link to DRAW. (JM)

    0 0

    The former director of Livingston County Veterans’ Services is speaking out following news of a Michigan State Police investigation into the department. It was learned Tuesday that Michigan State Police had launched a criminal investigation into the department. Detective 1st Lieutenant Tom DeClercq with the 1st District Special Investigations Section told WHMI it was requested they conduct a criminal investigation, which they are initiating and hope to have wrapped up in about two or three weeks. It stems from an allegation from a woman who was unable to obtain a donation receipt for a $400 check she wrote to Livingston County, with a committee member listed in the memo line. In August, the committee voted to fire former director Adam Smiddy, which was not long after he learned of the check and complaint. He served a little over one year in the role. Smiddy told WHMI he felt he was terminated, in part, because committee members knew he would see it through and not play the “buddy, buddy game” to make sure they were maintaining a degree of public trust in the work they were doing. He cited big conflicts with the committee because he was unwilling to play “good ole boys club” when it came time to delivering services. He noted instances of particular mechanics and contractors always being used but were not necessarily better for the funds being spent or the outcome they were getting. Smiddy ultimately said he hopes the Board of Commissioners will take a second look at the committee participants and their willingness to support the veterans’ millage, which was approved by voters in 2016. Additionally, local Democrats have raised questions about how the committee is spending funds from a county-wide veterans millage approved in 2016. To date, no one from the committee or county has disputed the budget numbers provided by Democrats in a press release posted on our website. Smiddy says numbers provided by Democrats are accurate and affirmed that the committee regularly resisted attempts to implement new programs and services. As part of his job, Smiddy said on average he would present new programs every three months but those also required funding for personnel, which was further needed due to other employees leaving. Red flags were first raised for Party Chairwoman Judy Daubenmier when Committee Chair Hansel Keene stated during a meeting that there was only $80,000 in available funds but records show close to one million dollars. Daubenmier says the Board of Commissioners is the oversight body and should have known that wasn’t true since they haven’t approved any new programs in the two years since the millage passed. She says meeting minutes show how the committee has stood in the way of getting services approved over and over again, including dragging out requests for months and refusing to replace benefit counselors who have quit – and the list goes on and on. Daubenmier says meeting minutes clearly reflect a divide between the committee and Smiddy. She says the committee was resisting any sort of effort to expand services all the time and there’s no excuse because that’s why the millage was passed. Daubenmier reaffirmed that the Board of Commissioners is the oversight body and appoints committee members so they need to be digging into this, rather than pretending everything is fine. She says they have the power to remove members and should do so immediately but also initiate an audit and make sure proper procedures are being followed. Daubenmier says there needs to be some tough questions asked about what the vision supposedly is for the committee in spending the money taxpayers were promised would go to veterans. She says the money shouldn’t being sitting there idle waiting for some rainy day that may never come. She says veterans need help now, the committee needs to provide it and commissioners need to clean house. At Monday night’s board meeting, committee members talked about how much members care about veterans and how they volunteer but Daubenmier says the proof is in what they do and they’ve done far less than what was promised with the money. Daubenmier says somebody needs to step up and take care of this, and that’s the responsibility of commissioners. She says they hand out a lot of plaques and pats on the back but when it comes time to making sure veterans get the relief and services they need, they’re not there for them. Finally, Daubenmier says Democrats have been accused of only caring about veterans because the election is close. She maintains the party has proven its concern for veterans year in and year out, through multiple fundraisers and including two years ago when they stood up to endorse the millage and asked people to support it. To date, no committee members responded to any requests for comment by WHMI. Commission Chair Don Parker had no comment on the criminal investigation. (JM)

    0 0

    A member of Green Oak Township’s Planning Commission has resigned for the second time, though township officials say his input will still be welcome in the years to come. A resignation letter from Commissioner Chuck Fellows came before the Board of Trustees Wednesday, which was accepted “with regrets”. Fellows, who previously announced he’d no longer be a resident of the township as of August 30th, sold his home and has plans to travel with his wife. This is Fellows’ second resignation from the Planning Commission. He retired in 2016 and wanted to spend some time traveling, prompting his first resignation. Fellows returned this year and filled a vacancy on the commission that Township Supervisor Mark St. Charles says desperately needed to be filled. One of Fellows’ most recent contributions is helping to develop the township’s first Capital Improvement Plan, which was in the process of being finalized as of last month. St. Charles says he can’t remember how long Fellows has been with the township, though it "seems like Chuck has been here forever". He says Fellows has so much knowledge it's unbelievable and that he will be "sorely missed". St. Charles adds Fellows isn't gone for good, noting that he will be around and will stay in touch, and that his feedback is always welcome. St. Charles wished Fellows and his wife well. St. Charles says the board is now looking to fill the vacancy on the Planning Commission and encourages interested residents to apply. In addition to a resume, St. Charles says they’re looking for a letter of interest that includes the candidate’s views on various issues and their reason for applying. Both the resume and letter can be emailed to St. Charles at supervisor@greenoaktwp.com. St. Charles says there are openings on the township’s Zoning Board of Appeals and Historic District Commission as well, and that the township is desperately seeking individuals to fill those spots. (DK)

    0 0

    The Livingston Educational Service Agency has a new director of special education serving Brighton Area Schools. Michelle Allison has been in the education field for 16 years, working with students of all ages and grades, in both general and special education settings. Officials say she brings an abundance of experience, having served in similar roles over the last several years. Allison said she has always heard positive feedback about the Livingston ESA and Brighton Area Schools and is very excited to be a part of both, adding everyone has been very welcoming and helpful. Allison says she’s looking forward to building relationships with staff and families within the community as well as working with the Livingston ESA and Brighton staff and families on how to continue to enhance programs and services for students. Executive Director of Special Education for the Livingston ESA Douglas Haseley said Allison possesses a great knowledge of special education and will be both a strong leader and advocate in ensuring positive outcomes for the students and families in Livingston County. Allison has a specialist degree in Education Leadership from the University of Michigan. She is a Doctoral Candidate with a dissertation research topic focusing in the area of inclusive practices and opportunities for students with special needs. Allison is also currently an adjunct professor at Spring Arbor University, instructing both undergraduate and graduate courses for the Special Education Department. (JM)

    0 0

    A former female officer at a correctional facility has filed a lawsuit alleging discriminatory employment conduct and practices and unbearable and hostile working conditions. Ashley Menchaca filed a lawsuit against the Michigan Department of Corrections in U.S. District Court in March. The complaint alleges four counts under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act including race/gender discrimination, sexual orientation discrimination, a hostile work environment and retaliation. Menchaca, who is Hispanic and openly gay, began working at the Woodland Center Facility in Whitmore Lake in January of 2016 and resigned last May. The facility currently houses prisoners experiencing a serious mental health crisis. Menchaca’s complaint alleges that issues started when she was transferred to the evening shift in December of 2016 and cites various instances of harassing conduct and inappropriate comments from supervisors and co-workers. The lawsuit seeks damages in the amount of $9,999,000. The MDOC has denied that any discriminatory conduct or practices occurred. It filed a motion this month to seeking to dismiss the count related to sexual orientation, saying the protections under Title VII do not extend to an individual’s sexual orientation. Court records show that motion will be determined by District Judge Terrence G. Berg without oral argument. A status conference in the case is scheduled in May. (JM)

    0 0

    Several motions to limit evidence against accused Judge Theresa Brennan were put forward at a hearing Wednesday. Retired Wayne County Circuit Judge William Giovan, who is serving as the Special Master in the complaint filed by the Judicial Tenure Commission, denied three motions while a deal with was made on the fourth. Brennan is accused of judicial misconduct, mostly connected to her relationship a State Police detective who served as the key prosecution witness in a 2013 murder trial she presided over. She also was accused of using staff members for personal errands and to work on her political campaigns. The first motion was to bar information about the relationship between Brennan and MSP Detective Sean Furlong before the trial of Jerome Kowalski. But the head of the JTC indicated they only planned to introduce evidence of the relationship during and after the trial, so a decision was not needed. The other motions also sought to either dismiss particular allegations or limit evidence, including telephone calls between Furlong and Brennan and the mention of prior complaints against Brennan. Judge Giovan ruled against all three. The full hearing on the JTC complaint will begin October 1st in 16th District Court in Livonia. After hearing from both sides, Giovan will make a recommendation on the charges to the Michigan Supreme Court, which will have the final say on what happens to Brennan. Meanwhile, a hearing is set Friday in Livingston County on a motion to disqualify an Eaton County judge from hearing a request by retired Circuit Court Judge Daniel Burress that a citizen’s grand jury investigate Brennan. (JK)

    0 0

    One of Hamburg Township’s own has risen through the ranks and been promoted to Fire Chief. Born and raised in Hamburg Township by a fire fighting family, it almost felt like destiny Tuesday night when the Board of Trustees appointed Nick Miller as the township’s next Fire Chief. Miller began his career when he was 14 years old as a junior firefighter with the local department. Progressing through the ranks, he was named Deputy Fire Chief in 2011, and took over as interim Fire Chief when when his former boss, Mark Hogrebe retired on July 1st. Miller, along with Hamburg Police Chief Rick Duffany, was instrumental in the establishment of the Hamburg Township Public Service Administration that was also formed Tuesday night. Miller’s swearing-in ceremony took place in front of a standing-room only crowd full of family, friends, and around 3 dozen firefighters from Hamburg and surrounding departments. Miller said he is very proud of all the firefighters locally, and that he looks forward to “continuing the tradition of taking care of the great residents of Hamburg Township.” He said some of his earliest photos are of him as an infant wearing his dad’s Hamburg Township firefighter hat. Supervisor Pat Hohl said he sees a passion for firefighting in Miller, and that they are all pleased that his dream of becoming Fire Chief has come to fruition.(MK)

    0 0

    An upcoming ceremony in Howell will recognize the service and sacrifice of those who were prisoners of war and those missing in action. National POW/MIA Recognition Day is annually observed in the United States on the third Friday of September, with it falling on the 21st this year. A ceremony honoring POWs and those missing in action will be held on the lawn of the historic Livingston County Courthouse in downtown Howell this Friday at 12pm. The ceremony is open to the public and will be held rain or shine. The event is being presented by 8th District Congressman Mike Bishop, who will serve as one of the event’s speakers in addition to Marty Eddy of the National League of POW/MIA Families. More than 82,000 Americans remain missing from WWII, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the Cold War, the Gulf Wars and other conflicts, according to the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. Out of the 82,000 missing, 75% of the losses are located in the Indo-Pacific, and over 41,000 of the missing are presumed lost at sea. (DK)

    0 0

    A Putnam Township man is threatening to take the township to court over materials left behind from the Rover pipeline. During the public comment period of Wednesday night’s meeting of the Board of Trustees, Putnam Township resident Earl Smith took issue with officials over a ticket he was a recently issued. The Board added it to their agenda. Smith was cited by the township for a large amount of crane mats that were left over from the Rover Pipeline project and transferred to his property when the pipeline finished in early July. The crane mats are long logs ranging up to 40 feet long that Rover laid down to use for driving construction vehicles over swampy areas during the project. Smith said the ones he had are 18 feet. Treasurer Pat Carney responded that he had them stacked 2 deep, taking up about 36 feet, then. Trustee Norm Klein said that when he drove by, the pure volume of what he saw was like nothing he had seen before, comparing it to a mountain. Putnam Supervisor Dennis Brennan said there were thousands of these used during the build, and that Rover was supposed to remove everything they brought when they left. Apparently many went to the Fyke gravel pit in Putnam, whom Smith works for, before he arranged for them to be brought to his property. Brennan explained part of the problem the Township has is with the sheer volume of timber. He said they are looking at 30+ semi loads that couldn’t possibly be used by the homeowner in a reasonable amount of time. Therefore, the only explanation he sees is that it will be stored for many years to come, or that Smith is planning on selling them. Brennan said both are unacceptable uses in Smith’s residential zone. Smith disputes his property is zoned residential, saying that it is agriculture. He said he planned on cutting the wood and using it to heat woodburning stoves he would install in his house and accessory buildings. He believes this will save him thousands of dollars on heat over the years. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has investigated the crane mats and said they weren’t contaminated. Brennan said, however, that the MDEQ didn’t want them sitting around stacked for long periods of time, and that they would take their own action, if needed, within 1-2 months. Smith had until September 5th to pay the $100 citation, but told officials he would dispute it in court. During a special meeting on September 4th, the Board of Trustees discussed the matter, unbeknownst to Smith who was unaware of the meeting. Clerk Sally Guyon said they were required to give 18 hours notice to the special meeting that was held on a Tuesday. Brennan said it was posted the Thursday before, 5 days in advance. The township contacted Rover, asking them to remove the materials, which they have begun to do. Smith feels that he should have been allowed a court date and for a judge to decide on whether he could have the wood or not, before it was removed. He added that he felt discriminated against for the amount of wood on his property. When Putnam Trustees began discussing the option of waiving the ticket once the wood was removed, Smith declared he didn’t want them to, and that would rather continue in court. He said the cost of the subcontractor removing the wood will likely cost him thousands of dollars. The Board took no further action. (MK)

    0 0

    A Highland Township couple has been arraigned on charges related to a narcotics raid on an adult foster care home. 45-year-old Angela Cockerham of Highland Township and her husband, 48-year-old Russell Cockerham, were in Oakland County Circuit Court Tuesday for an arraignment on several drug and other charges. They were filed after the Oakland County Narcotic Enforcement Team executed a search warrant at the Carter Country Homes in Holly on August 2nd following an investigation into drug dealing taking place on the premises. Police say the raid turned up cocaine, marijuana, ecstasy and morphine, along with firearms and packaging materials associated with drug trafficking. Angela Cockerham served as the facility manager for the adult assisted living home, where residents said Russell Cockerham regularly smoked marijuana and that suspected drug dealing at all hours would wake them up. He is charged with possession with intent to deliver cocaine, ecstasy and marijuana, possession of morphine, being a felon in possession of a firearm, five counts of felony firearm and being a habitual offender. He remains jailed on a $200,000 bond. Angela Cockerham is charged with one count of cocaine possession as well as a bond violation after testing positive for cocaine use last month. She has since been released. The couple is due back in court November 20th for a pre-trial hearing. State officials previously suspended the license for the group home, cited numerous violations including failing to provide a safe environment for residents. (JK)

    0 0

    Several motions to limit evidence against accused Judge Theresa Brennan were put forward at a hearing Wednesday. Retired Wayne County Circuit Judge William Giovan, who is serving as the Special Master in the complaint filed by the Judicial Tenure Commission, denied three motions while a deal with was made on the fourth. Brennan is accused of judicial misconduct, mostly connected to her relationship with a State Police detective who served as the key prosecution witness in a 2013 murder trial she presided over. She also was accused of using staff members for personal errands and to work on her political campaigns. The first motion was to bar information about the relationship between Brennan and MSP Detective Sean Furlong before the trial of Jerome Kowalski. But the head of the JTC indicated they only planned to introduce evidence of the relationship during and after the trial, so a decision was not needed. The other motions also sought to either dismiss particular allegations or limit evidence, including telephone calls between Furlong and Brennan and the mention of prior complaints against Brennan. Judge Giovan ruled against all three. The full hearing on the JTC complaint will begin October 1st in 16th District Court in Livonia. After hearing from both sides, Giovan will make a recommendation on the charges to the Michigan Supreme Court, which will have the final say on what happens to Brennan. Meanwhile, a hearing is set Friday in Livingston County on a motion to disqualify an Eaton County judge from hearing a request by retired Circuit Court Judge Daniel Burress that a citizen’s grand jury investigate Brennan. (JK)

    0 0

    Downtown Howell will be the site this weekend for a family friendly event to celebrate recovery and break down the stigma of addiction. Wake Up Livingston is holding the 2nd annual Recovery Walk at the Historic Howell Courthouse this Sunday morning. From 11am to 1:30pm individuals in recovery, family members, and recovery allies are invited to participate in the walk and several other activities surrounding it. Rebecca Raether of Unite to Face Addiction Michigan is three and a half years into recovery from alcohol addiction. She told WHMI she is excited to represent and show the community that recovery happens. She said there are people in recovering in the community everywhere, in all walks of life, and of all social statuses. She encouraged people to “…recover out loud and live out loud, and not live in the shadows. When you hide in the shadows, that’s where stigma is created.” There will be a sign making station at the courthouse for people who want to carry a poster with a message about recovery as they walk. Guest speakers will be on-hand to share their stories following the walk. There will also be free food, water, and a limited number of t-shirts. The Big Red Barrel will be on-site for anyone wishing to properly dispose of leftover prescription medications. Participation is free and open to the public. (MK)

    0 0

    More than 100 business and community leaders gathered in Howell, Thursday for an event highlighting the work a pair of non-profit organizations have done for the community. Crystal Gardens in Genoa Township was the site for the annual meeting between Ann Arbor SPARK and the Economic Development Council of Livingston County. The event highlighted successes from the partnership between the two that have resulted in 1,200 new job commitments and nearly $290 million of investments made by businesses in Livingston County. The partnership has also resulted in over 500 referrals connecting local companies to resources and funding since 2012. Ann Arbor SPARK President and CEO Paul Krutko addressed the crowd, emphasizing the importance of using regional economic development to improve the county’s quality of life by attracting and retaining companies that pay well, provide opportunity, and reinvest in the community. SPARK Senior Vice President Phil Santer highlighted key economic indicators, such as Livingston County having the lowest poverty rate and highest median household income in the state. The county’s tax base has also increased 4% over the past year. EDCLC Chairman Ron Long said that because of their relationship with SPARK , Livingston County is now on the map for site selectors from all over the world. (MK)

    0 0

    A woman charged with supplying the dose of heroin that killed a Gregory man has entered a plea. 37-year-old Lisa Mae Shears pleaded guilty to one felony count of delivery of less than 50 grams of a controlled substance in Washtenaw County Trial Court. She was originally charged with delivery of a controlled substance causing death, which is punishable by up to life in prison. Shears was said to have provided the fentanyl-laced heroin that killed a 32-year-old Gregory man on November 29th, 2016. Washtenaw County Sheriff's Deputies responded to the 7000 block of Parklawn Drive in Dexter Township, where it was determined the man died of an apparent drug overdose involving fentanyl. MLive.com reports that Shears and other people had been discussing drug interactions with the man via social media and while police were executing a search warrant, Shears was implicated in providing the drugs that led to the man's death. Shears remains held in the Washtenaw County Jail without bond pending her sentencing on October 18th. (JM)

    0 0

    The Brighton City Council has approved the site plan for a building which will become the permanent home of Bountiful Harvest. Bountiful Harvest is a 501 ©(3) non-profit organization that provides food and personal hygiene products to families and individuals in Livingston County. Bountiful Harvest, begun in 2011, has been housed in the Brighton Community Center for several months since the organization was told by a local church that it could no longer use its basement, which was needed for other things. The new building will be located behind the First Presbyterian Church at 300 E. Grand River in Brighton. Currently, there is a garage behind the church, but it will be torn down to make room for the new center. According to spokesman Terry Simpson the 3,300-square-foot building will allow Bountiful Harvest to expand its services and increase its hours. He tells WHMI that in 2016 the organization served 4,311 families, nearly 12,000 individuals, over 3,000 children and almost 2,500 seniors, and distributed nearly 250,000 pounds of food. First Presbyterian Church Pastor Scott Phillips says the church is happy to assist Bountiful Harvest in any way it can, in order to fulfill its goal of helping the less fortunate in Livingston County. Simpson says Bountiful Harvest receives absolutely no money from the federal, state or local governments, and there is no paid staff; all are volunteers. Groundbreaking for the new home for Bountiful Harvest will take place on Oct. 9th at 3 p.m. (TT) Photo: Bountiful Harvest food pantry

    0 0

    The investigation continues into an accident yesterday in South Lyon that left a woman in critical condition after being hit by a train. The 31-year-old was reportedly walking over the tracks at Ten Mile Road and Reynold Sweet Boulevard at about 1:15pm when she was hit by the train. The woman was taken to Providence Park Hospital in Novi and was last listed in critical condition. The intersection was closed for about two hours before reopening to traffic. It's unknown if the gates were down as she crossed over the tracks, but South Lyon Police Lt. Chris Sovik says there is no evidence of suicide or foul play and that they will view camera from the train on Monday to see if it can provide any more details. There is a trail system in the area and a witness told investigators it was raining heavily when the accident occurred and that she may have not seen the train. (JK)

older | 1 | .... | 734 | 735 | (Page 736) | 737 | 738 | .... | 779 | newer