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WHMI 93.5 FM Radio Station for Livingston County Michigan with News, Traffic, and Weather Service for Howell and Brighton

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    Officials with the new Emagine Theater set to open in Hartland Township recently took a tour of the facility as it prepares to open up later this year. Last Friday, Emagine Entertainment Chairman Paul Glantz, CEO Anthony LaVerde and CMO Melissa Boudreau toured the still-under construction facility being built in the Hartland Towne Square Shopping Center, at the northeast corner of Old US-23 and M-59. The 55,000-square foot venue is set for a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Friday, December 14th and then open to the public the following day. It will feature 1,140 seats in ten state-of-the-art auditoriums including a screening room, and an EMAX premium large format screen. Emagine Hartland will be the first theatre in Michigan to offer all heated reclining chairs and the first to deploy ten pure laser digital cinema projectors featuring high contrast lenses. It will also be the first and only theatre in Michigan to feature 100% laser projection systems. Among the amenities are a full-service bar, expanded concession menu, stadium seating, and special front row seating of cuddle chairs. Top picture (L-R) Paul Glantz; Chairman; Anthony LaVerde, CEO and Melissa Boudreau CMO of Emagine Entertainment, LLC Middle picture - Paul Glantz; Chairman inside soon-to-be new lobby of Emagine Hartland Bottom picture - (L-R) Paul Glantz, Chairman, Melissa Boudreau, CMO and Anthony LaVerde, CEO of Emagine Entertainment, LLC

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    Vice President Mike Pence has campaigned for Republican candidates ahead of next week's election, including 8th District Congressman Mike Bishop. Pence (top left) spoke Monday afternoon at an event in Oakland County for Bishop (top right), who is facing a challenge from Democrat Elissa Slotkin, and Lena Epstein (top center), who is running against Democrat Haley Stevens for an open congressional seat in the 11th District. The two races are competitive and are expected to help determine which party controls the House. Bishop told the crowd that Slotkin didn’t represent the values of the district. "She's never lived her before, she never lived in the district before, she's never owned property...the first time she voted (in the district) was for herself in the primary. We've got billionaires from California, from New York City, these elitists who want to come here and buy up this district. They are so angry that...they lost in 2016 and they will do anything they can to buy this district back." Slotkin's campaign has consistently pushed back on those claims, pointing out that she grew up on her family's farm in Holly, where she now lives since returning to the state last year. Bishop also made his case about the difference in their approach to the economy. "I worked with the Trump-Pence Administration to bring tax cuts to businesses and families. My opponent wants to repeal those tax cuts and has called for boycotts of businesses who support me and I have been working to help my whole career. That’s the choice this November.” Pence then finished the rally, telling the crowd "All that talk about a blue wave, let's just make sure that blue wave hits a red wall right here in Michigan." Meanwhile, Slotkin was canvassing homes in Brighton over the weekend, telling supporters (bottom picture) that she hoped to help bring a different tone to Washington. "My husband and I decided to do this together because we've never really been political people. He's a 30-year Army veteran. I'm a former CIA officer. You don't do a lot of politics when you're in those roles, but we just felt having worked for Democrats and Republicans that the tenor and tone of what's going on now is fundamentally different. It's just a different thing and fundamentally unbecoming of the country that we all love." Slotkin will campaign on Thursday with former Vice President Joe Biden in Lansing with Democratic gubernatorial nominee Gretchen Whitmer and Senator Debbie Stabenow. After the rally in Oakland County, Pence spoke in Grand Rapids at a get-out-the-vote rally for U.S. Senate nominee John James and other candidates. James is running against Stabenow. James will also be the keynote speaker at tonight's Reagan Day Dinner for the Livingston County Republican Party. (JK)

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    Troopers from the Michigan State Police (MSP) Brighton Post are seeking assistance in identifying a person of interest wanted for questioning regarding a retail fraud from a Howell area Mugg and Bopps store. If you have any information regarding the identity of the subject, please contact the Brighton Post at 810-227-1051.

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    Community members had the opportunity to share their thoughts on the future of Downtown Howell at an input session hosted by Howell Main Street Inc. The forum, held at Block Brewing Company in Howell Tuesday, sought feedback from residents, developers, and property and business owners. The event was separated into two parts, the first being a presentation of results from a recent survey that also sought community members’ input on the future of Downtown Howell. Jay Schlinsog, Principal with Downtown Professionals Network, says nearly 800 people responded to the community-wide survey, offering their opinions on land uses, services and experiences that could make the region a more dynamic area. Guests then sectioned off into groups and each was given a map of the downtown area with markers to indicate what they’d like to see added and what they could do without. Schlinsog says a common theme among the group was a desire to preserve Howell’s history. Schlinsog says it appears to be very important to community members to retain the things that distinguish Howell from other places. He also says it’s very apparent that residents want any new development to honor the past, while remaining complimentary to what makes Downtown Howell so unique. Schlinsog says the information gathered from the forum and the survey will now be used to produce future concepts for the area. Those ideas will be presented at an open house at the Howell Carnegie District Library on Thursday. The public unveiling will take place in the Meabon Room from 4 to 7pm and the community is encouraged to attend. (DK)

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    Today is the second in a series of profiles on the candidates for the Brighton Area Schools Board of Education on Election Day, November 6. There are six candidates for three seats — all of them four-year terms — on the Brighton school board. The candidates are Sean Hickman, Angela Krebs, Laura Mitchell, Ken Stahl, Andy Storm, and Kara Totaro. Today’s profile subject is Ken Stahl, the only incumbent running for a 4-year term on the board. Stahl is running for a second term, and says he likes helping kids and the schools. Stahl says he got interested in being on the board when he was appointed chairman of the steering committee for the “Yes for BAS” campaign which culminated in voter passage of an $88.5 million bond issue in 2012. He was elected to a four-year term in 2014. As a veteran board member, Stahl has taken several professional development courses in education, and now is certified by the Michigan Association of School Boards as a board of education member. Stahl says he has found public education to be his calling and wants to continue assisting the schools, particularly in areas such as leadership training. In the matter of finances, Stahl says although Brighton now has an A+ bond rating and an 8% fund equity, the board’s fiduciary responsibility is to continue making good budgetary decisions and adding to the fund equity to ensure that its financial stability continues. At the same time, he feels a proposed bond issue in 2019 would be something the district could handle, since the millage would merely replace expired school bonds, and therefore not increase the millage rate for district taxpayers. Stahl was appointed by the MASB to its Government Relations Committee in Lansing as an advocate for public education. In addition to improving academic programs, he also wants to bring more trades programs to the Brighton Area Schools. He is in a trade himself, as a licensed residential builder. Stahl was an independent contractor for 17 years before becoming employed by Corby Energy Services as major projects coordinator. Stahl said it’s a sad fact that 40% of college students drop out after their freshman year and “need a plan B” after they drop out. Toward that end, Stahl says he would like to help facilitate more partnerships with private industry, similar to what fellow BAS Board Trustee John Conely has accomplished with Brighton’s Robotics and Auto Tech programs. Stahl currently keeps busy as the Brighton Board of Education’s Facility Committee chair, a member of the Health Advisory Committee, the board’s liaison to Hornung Elementary School and to The Bridge Alternative High School, and is a Brighton High School Project Wildlife Club mentor. He says the knowledge he has gained through these positions as it relates to the inner workings of the school district makes him a “highly qualified candidate and better board member.” In his free time, he volunteers as basketball coach for the elementary grade-level Brighton Area Recreation Connection. Stahl has been married for 27 years to Carol, who is a teacher in the Clarenceville School District in Wayne County. The couple has three children: Kenny, a BHS graduate and senior at Eastern Michigan University; Brittnay, a BHS grad and first-year college student and Nathan, a 4th grader at Hornung Elementary. Thursday’s candidate profile will be about Kara Totaro. (TT) BIO: KENNETH STAHL AGE: 51 OCCUPATION: Major Projects Coordinator, Corby Energy Services Inc. FAMILY: Married with 3 children: two in college and the youngest, a Hornung 4th grader RESIDENCE: Genoa Twp. YEARS LIVED IN DISTRICT: 11 REASON FOR RUNNING: To continue to work hard toward academic and trades programs. GOALS: Maintain financial stability achieved in last four years, advocate for Brighton Schools in Lansing and ensure safety and well-being of each Brighton student. RECOMMENDED BY BEA: Yes POSITION ON 2019 BOND ISSUE: In favor of a bond proposal to complete restoration of BAS facilities

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    Two suspects are being sought by the Fowlerville Police Department following a reported attempt to abduct a child. A male and female on Monday around 5pm reportedly attempted to lure a young child that was playing in the front yard into their vehicle in Grandshire Trailer Park. The Fowlerville Police Department is looking for two suspects- a white male with short gray hair and a long curly beard and a white female with reddish, straight hair. The pair was said to be in a grey, four-door vehicle. If you know anyone that matches the description or have any information regarding the car in question, you're asked to call the Fowlerville Police Department at 517-223-8711 or Livingston County Central Dispatch at 517-546-9111. All tips are anonymous. Fowlerville Police Chief John Tyler told WHMI the incident appears to be isolated, as there have been no other similar reports made. Tyler says they “just want the community safe and to report any suspicious activity.” (DK)

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    A Democratic congressional candidate who blundered by telling thousands of supporters that she puts "party before country" will see her gaffe repeated in a TV ad backed by a Republican group. Elissa Slotkin, who is challenging Republican Congressman Mike Bishop in Michigan's 8th District, made the remarks at a rally last week with President Barack Obama and other Democrats in Detroit. She immediately corrected herself, saying it must be "country before party." But an independent political action committee aligned with House Speaker Paul Ryan is spending $1 million on ad that shows her faux pas. Slotkin was a national security expert in the Obama and Bush administrations. Her spokeswoman says the ad is a "desperate attempt to smear her and the worst example of politics as usual." (Associated Press) Her full remarks can be viewed through the link below.

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    Several of the GOP’s elected officials and candidates for office were in Genoa Township last night for the annual Reagan Day Dinner. More than 450 supporters took part in the event that was held by the Livingston County Republican Party at the Crystal Gardens Banquet Center. Lt. Governor candidate Lisa Posthumus Lyons was Master of Ceremonies. As she was finishing up her opening speech, state Attorney General and gubernatorial candidate Bill Schuette made an unscheduled appearance. Shuette, down in the polls to Democrat Gretchen Whitmer, but gaining in the past week, called himself “Michigan’s Comeback Kid.” True to the running theme of the night, he spoke about continuing forward with the work that’s been done in Lansing over the past 8 years and not going back to what Republicans are calling the “lost decade,” when Jennifer Granholm was governor. He called Livingston County a “great Republican county,” and a “great example of why Michigan wants to go forward, not backward.” The keynote speaker at the dinner was U.S. Senate Candidate John James. He said his opponent, incumbent Debbie Stabenow, doesn’t represent the people that have elected her, or their values. He called her part of the political royalty and elite in Washington, and that she is hyper-partisan and lacking the right kind of experience. James said it is his experience that makes him the right person for the job. He graduated from West Point 18 years ago, flew 750 hours of combat in Iraq, and created 100 new jobs while helping grow his family business 233%. Over 18 years, Stabenow, James said, has only produced “ineffectiveness”, “hyper-partisanship”, and “broken promises.” James said that while Stabenow has questioned his experience, it is the citizens who should be questioning her ability to lead. He continued, saying that he is not running to beat his opponent, but that he is running to serve the people of Michigan. Also in attendance were Michigan House Speaker Tom Leonard, who is running for Attorney General, candidate for Secretary of State, Mary Treder Lang, and U.S. Congressman Mike Bishop, who said that the Democrats in Michigan are mad at the state turning “red” in 2016, and warned that they, and his opponent Elissa Slotkin, are trying to buy this election with out of state money. Election Day is this coming Tuesday, November 6. (MK)

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    It’s straight A’s for one local school district and their annual audit. The Livingston Educational Service Agency’s Board of Education has received an unqualified, “clean,” opinion on their annual financial audit. An unqualified opinion is the highest an entity can receive. The audit was performed by Maner Costerisan, Certified Public Accountants. During the process, the auditing firm examines LESAs financial records, documents, and internal accounting systems to verify that all transactions have been recorded properly and done in line with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. The Audit Manager presented the audit which showed a General Fund variance of .3% on a $17-million budget and a Special Education variance of .06% on a $43-million budget to the LESA Board of Education earlier this month. The Agency, along with the financial staff in particular, was commended for their care, diligence, and preparation for the audit. (MK)

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    Robotics teams from around the state will power up in Howell for a student competition this weekend. The Howell Highlander FIRST Robotics organization is hosting a FIRST Tech Challenge Qualifier competition this Saturday. The event will take place at Parker Middle School field house, located at 400 Wright Road, in Howell. More than 30 teams will compete at this year’s challenge. The theme is Rover Ruckus. In Rover Ruckus, students create and operate robots that work in an alliance to descend from a lander, collect minerals from a crater, and then sort those minerals into the lander’s cargo hold. All four of Howell’s middle school teams will participate, along with other local teams from Brighton Area Schools, Hartland Consolidated Schools, and Charyl Stockwell Academy. The Opening ceremonies commence at 10:30am with qualification matches starting at 11. Elimination rounds begin at 5pm, with closing ceremonies set for 6:30. This event is free to attend and open to the public. (MK)

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    An event this weekend will help raise awareness of food insecurity suffered by area children, families and seniors. The Empty Bowl Project is a faction of the Community Sharing Outreach Center, which aids families in need in the Huron Valley School District. The Empty Bowl Project’s main event will take place this Sunday, November 4th, from 12 to 3pm at Bakers of Milford. The event will feature tastings of various soups made by community members, entertainment and a silent auction to support a common cause - eliminating empty bowls. Coordinators Denise and Lyle Tyler say the Empty Bowl Project began approximately three years ago with an art teacher in Farmington who made decorative pottery bowls that were used as serving dishes at events raising funds to fight hunger. After the event, guests were left with an empty bowl as a reminder of the many people who go hungry every day. Denise says the idea of a simple meal of soup, bread and water is a way to humbly simulate the situation of the many families who are food insecure and rely on a simple meal as their main food source. Guests with bowls that have been painted specifically for the project can use those bowls as an entrance ticket. A wide selection of painted bowls, many of which have been painted by local artists, will also be available at the door for a donation. More information about the event and the Empty Bowl Project can be found at the link below. (DK)

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    The unveiling of a statue this weekend will honor the man known to most simply as “Zemp” Duane Zemper was 96 when he passed away in 2016, leaving behind a legacy of community service and historical preservation. A decorated World War II combat photographer, Zemp moved to his wife’s hometown of Howell after the war, eventually co-founding the Howell Area Archives, preserving pictures dating back to the 19th century that otherwise would have been lost. He was also a lifelong volunteer, donating both time and money to local organizations including a 66-year record of straight attendance at Howell Rotary meetings. He was also an All-American at Eastern Michigan University and U.S. Olympic track qualifier. To honor that service, a committee of community leaders began the Duane Zemper Legacy Project to help fundraise for the creation of a statue of Zemper. It’s that statue that will be unveiled Sunday at 1pm on the front lawn of the Howell Carnegie District Library featuring a Missing Man flyover and Honor Guard salute. Following the unveiling there will be a Meet and Greet at the Howell Opera House to celebrate Zemper’s 99th Birthday. Cake and punch will be served. Some of Zemp’s work will also be on display at the Opera House as well as the Emmy Award Winning film “Through the Lens of Duane Zemper” along with the film “Creating the Zemp Legacy Monument”, put together by artist Colin Poole, who created the statue along with his wife Kristine. You’ll find additional information about Sunday’s event through the link below. (JK)

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    A Milford-based nonprofit will hold its yearly fundraiser Friday to benefit cancer patients facing financial difficulties. Five Points of Hope is a 501(c)(3) that awards monetary grants from its cancer care fund to patients that are struggling financially. The organization works with licensed oncology social workers to identify which patients qualify and provides up to $500 a year to those patients to help them pay some of their bills. One such individual that received financial assistance from Five Points of Hope was Dave Askew. Dave and his wife Rhonda were on social security and financially-strapped when they learned Dave had a brain tumor. Rhonda says they were collecting bottles and cans just to pay for gas to get Dave to his doctor’s appointments and on the brink of having their electricity shut-off when they met Five Points Founder Erin Welsh. Rhonda says Five Points not only paid for their electric bill, but also gave them gas vouchers to get Dave to and from his appointments. Dave unfortunately lost his battle with cancer this past March. Before he died, he wrote a thank you letter to Five Points, thanking them for the financial assistance he and Rhonda received when he was fighting cancer. Rhonda says by receiving the financial help, her husband was able to concentrate on his mental health and well-being; something that Five Points strives for as a part of its mission. The charity was able to grant $51,371 in financial assistance to 118 Michigan cancer patients in 2017. The organization’s “A Night to Remember” event is their largest fundraiser of the year. The 18th annual benefit will be held tomorrow at 6pm at the Edgewood Country Club in Commerce Township. All proceeds from the night, including the $5 admission collected at the door, go directly to the charity’s cancer care fund benefitting cancer patients. Additional details can be found at the link below. (DK) Photo 1: Casino-style gaming is a featured event at the Five Points of Hope cancer charity fundraiser, "A Night to Remember." Photo 2: Rhonda Askew of Fowlerville, formerly of Pinckney, holds a photograph of her late husband, Dave, who died of lung cancer in March. Dave wrote a beautiful letter of thanks to the cancer charity Five Points of Hope before he passed away, thanking them for the financial assistance he and Rhonda received when he was fighting cancer. Both photos courtesy of Teresa Silver.

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    A trial date has been set for the man charged with a break-in at the Scorpions Motorcycle Club in Lyon Township. 40-year-old Kinley Rae-Thomas Kelm was in Oakland County Circuit Court Wednesday for a pre-trial hearing on charges of breaking and entering with intent, larceny of firearms, being a felon in possession of a firearm and two counts of felony firearms for the incident on September 22nd of 2017. That’s when police say a fire was intentionally set and severely damaged the Scorpions Motorcycle Club headquarters building on Milford Road. A Bobcat belonging to a fence company working a project at the nearby War Dog Memorial was reportedly stolen, driven to the motorcycle club and used to crash through the clubhouse wall and move a large safe. Club members identified Kelm as a suspect in the break-in after noticing him in downtown South Lyon at a fundraiser, wearing a shirt that was from a locker inside the clubhouse. When questioned, Kelm reportedly said he was an out of state club member. While the B&E charges were authorized against Kelm, no charges were filed in connection with the fire that occurred the same night as the break-in. The official cause of the blaze was ruled arson by investigators. A November 26th trial date was set for Kelm, who remains jailed on a $100,000 bond. (JK)

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    This is the third in our series of profiles on candidates for the Brighton Board of Education, and today we are profiling Kara Totaro. Six people are running for 3, 4-year positions on the board in the November general election. The candidates are Andy Storm, Angela Krebs, Kara Totaro, Laura Mitchell, Sean Hickman and Ken Stahl, who is the only incumbent. The Totaro family formerly lived in Atlanta, Georgia, and before they moved to Michigan, Totaro looked at many school districts in the Detroit area before settling on the Brighton Area School District because of its strong academic program. She says her eldest daughter, Ella, graduated from BHS with 24 credit hours at Michigan State, thanks to advance placement classes. Totaro says she deeply cares about the Brighton Area Schools, and for the last five years has attended virtually all Brighton Board of Education meetings. She says a teacher told her some time ago that more parents should go to the board meetings because that’s where the decisions are made, and she has followed that advice. And she has occasionally addressed the board at call-to-the-public when she feels an issue needs to be brought to their attention or a board member has said something inappropriate under board guidelines. Totaro says she is running for the Brighton school board because she wants “to ensure that every kid is prepared for their future life, whether college or a trade.” She also wants to be a part of the process that will lead to an expansion of the curriculum and to new courses of study. Totaro says she is glad the board is placing more emphasis on the STEM program — which stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Math and STEAM initiative, which denotes Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Math - particularly STEAM, because she says the arts, including music, dancing and the theater, are important for a well-rounded education. Totaro says she also will work to keep the Shared Services and Schools of Choice programs strong, and wants the district to advocate for Shared Services before the legislature if the program is challenged. In Shared Services, the district provides courses and teachers for schools in a multi-county region who, because of their small size, do not have the resources to offer them. Shared Services has been a revenue generator for Brighton, earning about $2 million each year and being a major factor in eliminating the budget deficit. Totaro says she was “surprised” that she was not among the three candidates recommended by the Brighton Education Association - which represents district teachers at the bargaining table — since she has always been a strong supporter of teachers. Three of the six candidates (Krebs, Stahl and Mitchell) have been “recommended” by the BEA - while Storm, Hickman and herself — have not received the BEA’s endorsement. However, she expects many teachers to vote for her because of her extensive volunteer work over the years. Totaro began her volunteerism not long after moving into the district as a volunteer worker for the $88.5 million bond issue in 2012. For three years she was one of two parents on a science curriculum committee, composed mostly of teachers and administrators, which was charged with evaluating and choosing a new science curriculum for all grades. Totaro also was a Science Olympiad coach at Scranton Middle School for two years and has continued it at Brighton High for the last two years. She says it was a perfect match for her experience in the pharmaceutical device industry in the Chicago area after earning a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry. Totaro has also coordinated Hilton School plays, Maltby talent shows, the 2017 BHS Mock Accident and has held an office in the PTO since 2012 at either Scranton or the high school. She has also served on the BAS Technology Advisory Committee and Scranton Middle School Improvement Committee. Friday’s candidate profile will be on Sean Hickman. (TT) BIO: KARA TOTARO AGE: 48 OCCUPATION: Homemaker FAMILY: Married to Jay; two daughters - Ella, 19, an MSU freshman and Adriana, a BHS 11th grader RESIDENCE: Brighton Twp. YEARS LIVED IN DISTRICT: 12 REASON FOR RUNNING: The school district is in a good position and I want to keep it that way and more GOALS: Keep the school district strong and advocate for it RECOMMENDED BY BEA: No POSITION ON 2019 BOND ISSUE: In favor

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    Livingston County’s oldest Boy Scout Troop is holding an anniversary homecoming next weekend for all who’ve been a part or supported them through the years. Boy Scout Troop 362 out of Howell is holding their 90th anniversary celebration at Camp Munhacke, in Gregory on Saturday, November 10. Established in 1928, for the first 30 years they were chartered with Howell Public Schools. From 1958 until 2008, they were chartered with the Lions Club Howell. Following their disbandment, the Howell Rotary Club stepped up and has been the troop’s Charter Organization since. Assistant Scout Master Steve Baranski said anybody who has been a part of the troop or been associated with them is invited, including businesses, sponsors, and members of the Howell Area Chamber of Commerce. Traditionally, Troop 362 uses this weekend event in November as a family cookout. Scouts cook a turkey, while family members bring a side dish or dessert. Afterwards, there will be a firebowl where the scouts will entertain with skits and songs. Some will share the history of the Troop, and this year they are looking forward to alumni coming to share their memories with them around the fire. Baranski said they usually ask to attendees for $5 a head, topping out at $20 for family. An RSVP is appreciated to ensure there is enough food to go around. Camping and RV opportunities are available. For more information on this, the event, or to reserve a spot, contact Charter Organization Representative Patti Griffith at pgriff@cac.net. (MK)

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    Middle School students in Howell are spending time paying it forward to others in need with warm blankets. Fleece and Thank You is a non-profit organization that helps liven up and warm otherwise dreary hospital rooms with colorful blankets for the children staying in them. Along with warmth, the blankets also provide the kids with hope and comfort during their treatment. This month, Parker Middle School students in Howell, behind the motto “Other People Matter,” are getting involved to help their less fortunate peers. Students will be making the blankets during Patriot Time on Monday, November 19th. Friends and family are invited to donate to the cause, as for every $24 that is brought in, the group will get to make an additional blanket. Parent volunteers are also being sought. The school hopes to make 4 to 5 blankets in each Patriot Time class of 20 students. For more details or question, send an email to info@fleeceandthankyou.org. (Photo- Facebook) (MK)

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    Governor Rick Snyder has reappointed 3 local residents to a state board aimed at preventing grand theft auto. Earlier this week, Governor Snyder announced 14 appointments and reappointments to multiple boards throughout the state. In particular, the Automotive Theft Prevention Authority Board of Directors saw 3 reappointments of the local flavor. The first is Michael Thompson of Mason. Thompson is the former vice president and general manager of DK Security in Lansing. He will represent purchasers of auto insurance in Michigan. Lori Davis of Wixom was reappointed to continue representing as an auto insurer doing business in the state. Davis has 32 years of experience at Allstate Insurance Company. The third reappointment is Curtis Caid of Brighton. Caid is Chief of the Livonia Police Department. With a bachelor’s in criminal justice and participation in several law enforcement advance leadership programs, Caid has worked his way up the ranks in the Livonia PD, beginning as a patrol officer in 1979. Members of the Board of Directors will serve 4 year terms, expiring on July 1st, 2022. Their reappointments are subject to the advice and consent of the State Senate. (MK)

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    An event this weekend will help raise funds to preserve a structure nearing its 150th anniversary. The Shiawassee Mills Questers Chapter #420 is inviting the public to attend a fundraiser this Saturday for the preservation of the Linden Mill Building. Located on the Shiawassee River, the mill was built in 1871 and placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. In between, the dual grist mill and saw mill was rebuilt after suffering a serious fire in 1903. The building houses the Linden Branch of the Genesee District Library and has been the home of the Linden Mills Historical Society Museum for more than forty years. The Questers have donated to Preservation and Restoration fund for several projects over the years, including, the placement of the Historical Marker in front of the building. Stairs leading to the second floor of the mill which leads to the Linden Historical Society was also a project of the Quester group. Saturday’s fundraiser will take place at the Loose Center in downtown Linden, from 1 to 4pm, with lunch and dessert provided by Caretel Inns of Linden and Alpine Marketplace. There will also a silent and live auction, with prizes including golf and dinner at Spring Meadows Country Club, a leaf blower and a wine tasting party. Tickets are $25 in advance or $35 at the door. For more information, call (810)-875-2154. (JK)

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    With less than one week to go before the General Election, WHMI is continuing efforts to get local voters ready and educated. One gray area for some is what’s known as over/under voting. Voters are actually not required to cast a vote in every race or on every question. That means if they choose to leave a race or a question blank, the rest of the votes on their ballot will still be counted. Livingston County Clerk Elizabeth Hundley tells WHMI a voter can cast a ballot in all of the races they wish to vote for. She says locally, there are plenty of races that people do not cast a vote for and voters can leave a particular race blank if they choose. Unlike an overvote, a ballot will not be canceled or disqualified because of an undervote. Hundley says an example of over-voting would be if a particular race says to vote for not more than two candidates but someone votes for more than two. When the voter goes to process that ballot in the tabulator, it would be pushed out and state they have voted for more candidates than allowed in that particular race. Hundley says at that point, the voter can spoil that ballot and go complete a new one and stay within the two. If a voter chooses not to cast a vote in a particular race, she says the scan machine will go ahead and accept that ballot and just not cast a vote for that particular contest. Hundley says there are some races people tend to not vote. An undervote could be intentional such as a protest vote, tactical voting, or abstaining from a certain race. It could also be unintentional due to oversight on the voter's part or a confusing ballot design. One of the reasons someone might not feel comfortable casting a vote in a particular race is because they are not educated on the candidates or the proposal. Livingston County Elections Coordinator Joe Bridgman says for example, under-voting mostly happens in races on the ballot that state to vote for two candidates, and only two candidates running. He tends to find is that a lot of voters assume those people have already won that election so they just choose not to vote for those individuals on the ballot. Bridgeman reminds that every single vote counts. He says just because it might state vote for two on the ballot and there might be only two candidates running, those two votes still matter. Additional information for voters to prepare ahead of next Tuesday’s election, along with details about local races and ballot proposals is available on the Livingston County Clerk’s webpage. That link is provided. (JM)

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