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WHMI 93.5 FM Radio Station for Livingston County Michigan with News, Traffic, and Weather Service for Howell and Brighton

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    Several local schools and school districts will receive grant money to support the implementation of additional safety measures. The Michigan State Police (MSP) announced Wednesday that 114 public school districts, 42 non-public schools, 22 public charter schools, and 10 Intermediate School Districts / Regional Education Services Agencies will receive $25 million in state grants to purchase equipment and/or technology to improve the safety and security of school buildings, students and staff. Over $69 million in requests were included in 407 applications submitted. Several schools and school districts in Livingston County were among the list of recipients. Howell Public Schools will receive $244,915, Brighton Area Schools will receive $98,948, Hartland Consolidated Schools will receive $23,169, Light of the World Academy in Pinckney will receive $22,930, St. Mary Catholic School in Pinckney will receive $22,871, and the Charyl Stockwell Academy in Howell will receive $20,000. Those grants do not require matching funds. The Livingston Educational Service Agency has been awarded $480,000, though their grant does require matching funds. MSP Director Col. Kriste Kibbey Etue says the Competitive School Safety Grant Program will provide the resources needed by many schools throughout the state to ensure students have a safe learning environment”, adding that “the review committee gave priority to proposals that sought to secure access points at school buildings, as it is considered one of the best and most cost-effective ways to improve school safety and security.”

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    This is the fourth in our series of profiles on candidates for the Brighton Board of Education. Six people are running for 3, 4-year positions on the board next Tuesday in the November general election. The candidates are Andy Storm, Angela Krebs, Kara Totaro, Laura Mitchell, Sean Hickman and Ken Stahl - the only incumbent. Today we are profiling Sean Hickman. Hickman is a full-time, tenured professor at Lansing Community College, where he teaches logic controller classes. His wife, Megan, is a school social worker at Hawkins Elementary School in Brighton, but is employed not by the Brighton Area Schools but by the Livingston Educational Service Agency. Hickman says he wants to be on the Brighton Board of Education because he feels he can use his engineering skillset to help the district at a time when technology continues to advance at an exponential rate. He says the establishment of STEM and STEAM centers in the Brighton Area Schools “goes hand-in-hand” with his goal of promoting more career readiness on the part of students. Hickman says, he is “surrounded by a lot of (community college) students who don’t know what they’re good at or interested in.” He is also running because he has 3 children in the Brighton schools and says he wants them to have the best education possible. Since moving to the Brighton area in 1997, Hickman has been involved for over 20 years with the Brighton Area Schools as an age group and high school swimming coach. Prior to becoming a teacher Hickman was an engineer at Gast Manufacturing in St. Joseph, MI. He got his bachelor’s degree from Michigan State University and master’s in curriculum and instruction at Ferris State University. Before teaching at the college level, Hickman was the instructor in the robotics program at Pinckney High School beginning in the year 2000, and taught robotics for 15 years before being hired to teach at Lansing Community College. At Pinckney, Hickman was instrumental in leading the Robotics team to six national titles. Hickman says he switched to teaching at the college level because he “wanted a new challenge,” and was drawn to LCC because it had just built a state-of-the-art robotics facility and program. Because of his extensive high school and college background, Hickman says he has a strong understanding of curriculum, school funding, special education, CTE, school technology, facility management, and instructional best practices. Hickman says he is not bothered by the fact that he isn’t one of the candidates “recommended” by the Brighton Education Association, the union which represents Brighton teachers at the bargaining table, since he is a member of the unionized LCC faculty and his wife is a certified educator employed by LESA. Hickman says he supports the likely bond issue next year to allow facility upgrades and STEAM centers at district schools. He says back in 2012 the Brighton school board did what he calls “an incredible job” — getting an $88.5 million bond issue passed. If a proposed 2019 bond issue passes, he would like to make sure the district spends the money effectively as a Board of Education member. (TT) BIO: SEAN HICKMAN AGE: 51 OCCUPATION: Full-time tenured professor at Lansing Community College FAMILY: Married to Megan; three Children: Ari, age 10, Maltby Intermediate; Trey, age 9, Hawkins Elementary; Tate, age 7, 1st grader at Hawkins RESIDENCE: Green Oak Twp. YEARS LIVED IN DISTRICT: 21 REASON FOR RUNNING: To lend his expertise in engineering and technology and promote development of STEAM Centers at district schools GOALS: To help the district continue to improve academically, see passage of a bond issue in 2019 and build on the current $5 million fund equity RECOMMENDED BY BEA: No POSITION ON 2019 BOND ISSUE: In favor

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    A member of the Pinckney Community Schools Board of Education who is up for re-election has announced her intent to resign at the end of the calendar year. Terri Bankes, in a letter to PCS Superintendent Rick Todd and Board of Education President Michelle Crampo, revealed that due to job demands from her outside work will no longer be able to serve her position on the Board, effective December 31st. Bankes has served on the Board for 10 years, primarily as Treasurer, and currently as Vice President. She spoke on the turnaround the district has made in the past decade, and while she won't be on the Board for the end of it, was proud to be a part of the upswing. Bankes was heavily involved in Pinckney athletics, especially the Pirate football program. Superintendent Todd said that she has devoted hundreds of hours and raised tens of thousands of dollars for it over the years. Todd while Bankes will still be around when her job allows, her presence on the Board will be missed. Todd said she wanted to get out in front and let people know of her intent so that they wouldn't waste a vote on her. Bankes is on Tuesday's ballot for a 6-year term with Amanda Mortensen, and fellow Board members Bethany Mohr and Mellissa Mueller. Should Bankes be one of the top 2 vote-getters, upon her resignation the Board will have to go through the appointment process to find a replacement to finish her term. (MK)

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    Congressman Mike Bishop may not have attended Thursday’s political rally featuring former Vice President Joe Biden, but his name was invoked repeatedly as Democrats eye an opportunity to flip the 8th Congressional District from red to blue. Battling laryngitis, Biden urged the crowd of more than 2,000 who gathered in the Lansing Community College gymnasium and overflow room to improve the tenor of politics by electing candidates with “character,” and ideals like, “integrity, decency, treating everyone with respect, giving no safe harbor to hate.” While touting gubernatorial candidate Gretchen Whitmer and incumbent Sen. Debbie Stabenow, Biden focused his remarks on 8th District Democratic candidate Elissa Slotkin in her race to unseat Bishop. Talking up her service as a CIA officer in Iraq, Biden called her, “a patriot through and through” who “repeatedly put her life on the line for the country.” When it came time for Slotkin to speak, she addressed her opponent, saying she “targeted Al-Qaeda in Iraq” and “taken fire from Iranian rockets” and that attack ads by Bishop and the Republican Party didn’t scare her. While she spoke inside, Bishop campaign volunteers demonstrated outside with pallets of fake cash, highlighting Slotkin’s support for the Obama administration’s Iran nuclear deal that included the release of up to $150 billion in Iranian assets that had been frozen under economic sanctions. Bishop consultant Stu Sandler said both Slotkin and Biden “were misguided in their attempts to buy off the very terrorist forces that supported ISIS.” Slotkin called the protest a “gimmick” and “sad statement of what’s happened in politics.” (JK)

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    The Brighton City Council voted Thursday night to approve a contract with Rich & Associates Parking Consultants of Southfield in the amount of $20,500 to conduct a traffic study in downtown Brighton. The study will take from 4-6 months to complete, according to City Manager Nate Geinzer. He says the city needs the parking study in order to develop a long-range plan to deal with the downtown’s parking needs and to determine what he calls “the right mix” of public and private parking. The study will determine parking usage counts at various downtown lots, as well as on-street parking, to determine occupancy levels and peak parking times. The study will also look at possibly consolidating parking in specific locations. Since the study is likely to start around Dec. 1st, it will also look at holiday parking levels and concentrations, and in about four months take a look at next spring’s parking since the study will take up to a half-year to complete. To handle the pressure on the inadequate number of parking spaces, the city is also considered metered parking and the possibility of a parking structure, although estimates put the latter’s cost at as much as $9 million or even more. Downtown merchants will be given a chance to offer their own input on parking needs and solutions during the study period. Two council members – Jim Bohn and Renee Pettengill – questioned whether the study will simply repeat what a 2015 parking study determined, but Geinzer said it will be much more comprehensive than the 2015 study, which was more to determine usage and peak times. Also, Geinzer says the current ordinance, which absolves a business owner from the responsibility of providing parking for customers if the need is less than 65 spaces, is out of date and needs to be revisited. (TT)

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    It’s time to change the clocks and fall back this weekend. Daylight Savings Time ends this Sunday. Clocks will need to be set back one hour at 2am on Sunday, although it’s a much simpler task now considering most clocks and other devices automatically adjust. Local fire departments remind residents and businesses that it’s also an opportune time to change the batteries in smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. Smoke alarms are said to be the best first line of defense as they are proven to reduce tragic deaths and injuries and it only takes a few minutes to change the batteries. Various fire safety tips and information can be found on the National Fire Protection Association website at www.NFPA.org. (JM)

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    Michigan Republican gubernatorial nominee Bill Schuette will be in Livingston County this weekend as part of the “Get Out The Vote” tour. Schuette and running mate Lisa Posthumus Lyons, Secretary of State nominee Mary Treder Lang and Congressman Mike Bishop are all scheduled to appear. This marks Schuette’s second visit to Livingston County in less than a week to campaign ahead of Tuesday’s General Election. He is pictured at the local GOP Regan Day Dinner. Various stops are scheduled around Michigan Saturday and Sunday. The local rally will be held from 6:15 to 7pm Saturday at the Bill Schuette/Mike Bishop campaign office located at 403 E. Grand River Ave, Brighton, MI 48116. Doors open at 6pm. (JM)

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    A longtime Fowlerville Police sergeant has caved to pressure for a good cause. Sergeant Jeffrey Soli serves as the Fowlerville High School liaison officer and last July, traveled to Kansas to pick up his new partner, K-9 Hank. Also around that time, his daughter Michelle was trying to get him to take part in the lip synching challenge that many other police departments were doing. He made a deal with his daughter that if she managed to raise $500 to be donated to a good cause of some sort, then he would make a video. Well, she managed to raise $2,000 in four days and presented a check to the Fowlerville High School counseling department on Monday. Soli tells WHMI the funds will go toward suicide prevention efforts at Fowlerville High School, where students from the video production class helped him produce the video that was released Thursday. Soli tells WHMI people have been trying to get him to do a lip sync challenge for a while and joked that he couldn’t believe people actually donated. He says they waited until school started so the video production class could assist with making the video. That happened around three or four weeks ago and the video was officially released on Thursday. Soli says the funds raised will be put to good use. He says there are a lot of kids in school that apparently don’t have insurance who need to see an outside counselor so some of the funds will go toward that. (JM)

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    Democratic gubernatorial nominee Gretchen Whitmer was in Brighton earlier today rallying the troops as Election Day draws near. More than 100 supporters packed the Livingston County Democratic Headquarters in Brighton in anticipation of the candidate’s arrival. This visit was one of 80 that Whitmer is making across the state in these final days leading up to the election. 42nd District nominee Mona Shand led off the event before handing over the stage Attorney General candidate Dana Nessel. Nessel spoke to the crowd about wanting to lift up Whitmer’s policies, and not be an A-G who is trying to tear them down. She also shared her feelings on the importance of cleaning up PFAS, protecting health care, and going after crooked auto insurers. Secretary of State nominee Jocelyn Benson then warned supporters about how hopeful they felt in the days leading up to the 2016 election, and then to how they felt the day after. She asked if that felt that could have done more, and to not repeat that mistake this election cycle. It was then that Whitmer took the stage to rally the troops largely behind that theme. She joked with the crowd about how she heard there weren’t many democrats in Livingston County, and later told WHMI about all the local support she’s found. Whitmer said, “I tell you, I have found so many phenomenal allies in Livingston County. And you know, I never look at a map as blue or red; I look at it as a map of Michiganders who need a governor who understands what the issues are and wakes up every morning rolling up her sleeves and (gets) to work to solve them.” Whitmer said that all the work that’s been done these last 22 months doesn’t hold a candle to what needs to be done in the last few days. With the women’s march, pride parades, immigration rallies, and black lives matters events, she said if they don’t keep their pedal to the medal, none it matters. She told the crowd, “We didn’t come this far, to only get this far.” She urged her supporters to get out there and remind people that who the governor is impacts them daily; from the minute they turn on the tap to brush their teeth, to the schools they take their kids to, to the roads they use to get to work. Whitmer then posed for pictures with her supporters in front of the “Let’s Get it Done” tour bus before boarding and moving on to the next stop. (MK)

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    Judges across the state, and here in Livingston County, will finalize adoptions for children in courthouse ceremonies later this month. Livingston County families will celebrate the Thanksgiving season by welcoming new members to their families on Adoption Day - Tuesday, November 20th. “Giving Thanks for Families” is a holiday tradition held on the Tuesday before Thanksgiving each year, highlighting the importance of adoption and the needs of children in foster care. Livingston County Chief Judge Miriam A. Cavanaugh along with Michigan Court of Appeals Chief Judge Christopher Murray will preside over the ceremonies at the Livingston County Judicial Center on Highlander Way in Howell. Officials say the happy families will be celebrating, along with judges, court staff, and social workers as adoptions are finalized for several local children. Michigan Adoption Day is co-sponsored by the Michigan Supreme Court, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, the Child Welfare Services division of the State Court Administrative Office, and Michigan Adoption Resource Exchange (MARE). Adoption Day is said to be important to create the long lasting “forever families” for the children of Livingston County who are in need of permanency and stability in their lives. Local officials say they’re happy to be part of the event and provide the platform for these children to become part of their own forever family. (JM)

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    WHMI has been profiling candidates all week for the Brighton Area Schools Board of Education. Today’s profile is on Laura Mitchell, an attorney who is making her first run at a position on the school board. Mitchell lives with her husband, Michael and daughter, Avery, a 4th grade student at Hornung Elementary School. Mitchell graduated from Howell High School and earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Michigan State University, after which she obtained a Juris Doctorate degree from the Thomas M. Cooley Law School.She has been a Brighton Area School District resident for 12 years. Mitchell has her own law practice in Howell and currently serves as president of the Livingston County Bar Association. She is also co-president of the Hornung School PTA. Mitchell says that if she is elected she will work to maintain the high quality of the Brighton Schools and strive to keep the students, staff and administration safe, and uphold and update security measures in the district. Mitchell says she’s proud to have a daughter in the Brighton school system and has been an officer in the school PTO for several years and thus she “ thought it was time to step up.” Mitchell says while she is running partly because she has a daughter in the Brighton Schools, she also wants to “make sure there are programs out there — whether college, JROTC or vocational programs — to help (students) transition into the world.” Mitchell says she thinks the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) program in Brighton schools is great and looks forward to enhancing the program if the pending bond issue is brought before the voters next year and passes. While Mitchell says Brighton has excellent schools, she says there is always room for improvement. She “supports and would enforce the Brighton Action Model for Success and would uphold the Board of Education goals as outlined in that model.” Mitchell would also work “to enrich programs to improve students’ academic and personal achievement and focus on training and professional development for administrators, teachers and even board members.” Mitchell says she is sorry to see the teaching of cursive writing and reading go by the wayside in school districts and would advocate for returning it to the school curriculum. “Many historical documents, such as the Declaration of Independence and the US Constitution, were written in cursive,” she says. Mitchell is one of three candidates who have received a “recommendation” from the Brighton Education Association, which negotiates contracts on behalf of Brighton teachers. (TT) BIO: LAURA MITCHELL AGE: 48 OCCUPATION: Attorney FAMILY: Married, one daughter, age 9; 4th grader at Hornung Elementary RESIDENCE: Genoa Township YEARS LIVED IN DISTRICT: 17 Years REASON FOR RUNNING: Want to get involved for my daughter and all students attending BAS, and believe my commitment to area as life-long resident and status as a local attorney would serve me well on the school board. GOALS: Maintain the high-quality education BAS offers, safe schools for students and staff and continue financial stability RECOMMENDED BY BEA: Yes POSITION ON 2019 BOND ISSUE: In Favor

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    At the study session before its regular meeting Thursday night, the Brighton City Council was given a presentation on inhaling the vapor from e-cigarettes – called “vaping” – and the possibility of passing a local ordinance to limit the practice by minors. A presentation was given by Brighton High School Liaison Officer Chris Parks on vaping, which is illegal for minors under the age of 18 under federal law. However, Michigan is the only state in the nation in which vaping by minors is not illegal. Although federal law trumps Michigan law, it doesn’t bar the possession of vaping products by those under 18. As a result, the city of Brighton is looking at enacting an ordinance that would ban both the sale of e-cigarettes to minors and possession of e-cigarettes or vaping products by minors. Brighton School officials were at the meeting and said that vaping at the secondary school level has become a virtual epidemic. City officials were told that at, one Brighton school, over 100 e-cigarettes or vaping devices were confiscated last year and they are well on their way to topping that mark this year. National figures show that 3 million school-age children, including 600,000 middle school students – have tried vaping. And the concern is that it could lead to trying stronger substances, such as regular cigarettes or marijuana. Many students reportedly regard it as “cool” to vape, but besides nicotine, e-cigarettes can also contain volatile organic compounds and heavy metals, including lead, nickel and tin. Bradford says the city wants to implement an ordinance that would keep e-cigarettes from getting into the hands of minors, but more importantly, target businesses that sell such products to minors, typically, gas stations and party stores. Another problem is that e-cigarette products can be obtained online. Bradford says no citations under federal law have been issued to any Brighton businesses at this time. (TT)

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    A lane closure could cause delays on I-96 near Williamston this weekend. A single lane closure is planned on I-96 for bridge deck maintenance. The Michigan Department of Transportation is scheduled to perform routine maintenance on both the Doan Creek and Deer Creek bridge decks near Williamston Road. As a result, eastbound I-96 will have the right lane closed from Zimmer Road to Dietz Road. Work is scheduled to begin around 8am Sunday and be completed by 4pm. M-DOT says performing regular maintenance on bridges helps improve and extend the service life of the structures and closing lanes during this type of work is necessary to provide the safest work area possible for crews and motorists. (JM)

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    Howell Main Street Inc. and the Howell Downtown Development Authority have much to keep in mind when planning for the future, having received feedback from community members in the form of a survey and input session. Posters, maps and sticky notes with ideas were posted all over the walls of the Meabon Room at the Howell Carnegie District Library Thursday night for Howell Main Street Inc.’s “Unveil Open House”. The display was the culmination of consultants, city leadership, Main Street and the DDA’s efforts over the course of several months in which they gleaned data and sought feedback on what the community would like to see in Downtown Howell’s future. Howell Main Street Inc. received the consultation services as a part of their win earlier this year for the National Great American Main Street Award. Howell Main Street Inc. C.O.O. and Downtown Development Director Cathleen Edgerly says it's been an exciting process, adding that "as a community continues to evolve, we need to continue to evolve with it." Edgerly says, "Seeing the outpouring of community engagement and participation from new residents, to five generations living here in Howell, to business owners and developers and really the whole gamut, we received a lot of very positive input in talking about the future of downtown." Some generally-agreed upon ideas included preservation of the downtown’s history, an indoor “market-hall”, linear gardens, parking space, places to play or gather, intensive housing and spaces for non-retail businesses. Landscape Architect Michael Schroeder aided in the information-gathering process and shared what comes next, now that the consultants, Main Street and DDA have all of these ideas to work with. Schroeder says, "There's a difficulty in saying well, 'how does this apply to all of this?' And what we wouldn't ever do is take these ideas and stick them somewhere in downtown. We go through a process." Schroeder added, "The first thing that needs to happen is a really robust look around the ideas to make sure they're landing on the right ideas and that as they take on the next round of projects in downtown, that they don't cut-off the opportunity as they do a street reconstruction project or some utility project." Schroeder says the goal was to stimulate dialogue in the community. An input session held earlier in the week drew approximately 40 people and an online survey received nearly 800 responses. (DK)

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    The candidates are Andy Storm, Laura Mitchell, Ken Stahl, Sean Hickman, Kara Totaro, and Angela Krebs. The top three vote-getters will be elected to four-year terms. Today’s profile is on Andy Storm, who lives in Brighton Twp. with his wife, Amy, and their eight children, all of whom are students in Brighton Area Schools. Storm, who was born and raised in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, is the President & CEO of Eckhart, Inc., a Michigan-based Industry 4.0 advanced manufacturing solutions provider. He also serves as Chairman of the Capital Area Manufacturing Council, the Lansing Community College Center for Manufacturing Excellence Advisory Board, the MIT Leaders for Global Operations Alumni Council and the Michigan Tech Industry Advisory Board. Storm earned Bachelor of Science degrees in business administration and Mechanical Engineering Technology from Michigan Technological University in Houghton, MI, an MBA from MIT’s Sloan School of Management and an MS degree in Engineering Systems from the MIT School of Engineering. At Eckhart, Storm is responsible for accelerating the development and adoption of Eckhart’s Industry 4.0 advanced manufacturing solutions that include autonomous guided vehicles, collaborative robots, additive manufacturing, micro sensor/spatial positioning systems, and ergonomic lift-assist & secure tools. Eckhart customers include many of the leading companies in the aerospace, medical, food industry, and engineering fields. Storm says if elected, his goal as a board of education member would be for the Brighton Area Schools to partner with other schools in select regional locations around the state, and partner with corporations with foundations such as those at GM, Ford and other companies, to help grow STEM-based curricula and solicit donations from the foundations. The goal is to build regional brick-and-mortar, advanced manufacturing centers affiliated with high schools in Brighton, the Grand Rapids area, the Northern Lower Peninsula and the UP so that students could collaborate with the corporations and be exposed to all of the technological and manufacturing advancements in such high-tech industries. Although he says it is not the reason for his running for the school board, another issue Storm is passionate about is some of the literary materials that are getting into the Brighton Area Schools. At a school board meeting last April, Storm complained about a novel that had been suggested for his then-13-year-old daughter by an employee in the high school media center for a school assignment. The novel, Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew A. Smith, follows the life of two young high school boys who fight for their lives during an apocalypse. It won the Boston Globe-Horne Book Award for Fiction. Calling it the, “demented writing of a pervert,” Storm complained that it contained sexually explicit references and other questionable material involving adolescents. Storm told the board that such books should not be on the shelves or otherwise available for students. Nonetheless, Storm says he is a strong supporter of the Brighton Area Schools and says the district is providing an excellent education for his children and the other 6,000 students. If elected, Storm says he would promote accelerated STEM-based learning in the elementary schools, more hands-on early stage reading, and an active “earn by doing” middle school and high school class environment that promotes teamwork, leadership, and diversity of thought among the student population. (TT) BIO: ANDY STORM AGE: 40 OCCUPATION: President & CEO of Eckhart, Inc. FAMILY: MARRIED (Amy); eight children (5 girls and 3 boys) ranging in age from 7 to 17, all students in the Brighton Area Schools RESIDENCE: Brighton Twp. REASON FOR RUNNING: To accelerate introduction of the 4.0 curriculum in the Brighton Area Schools GOALS: To increase dialogue with regional technical schools, community colleges and universities to expand the joint programs that allow BAS students to take college courses prior to graduation. RECOMMENDED BY BEA: No POSITION ON 2019 BOND ISSUE: In favor

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    Michigan Lt. Governor Brian Calley was in Brighton Friday, not to campaign on behalf of Republican candidates, but to visit Hilton Elementary School and hear about its STEM program. STEM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, and the Brighton Area Schools has either STEM or STEAM – which adds art – including the dramatic arts and music – to the STEM program. School administration and staff have been excited about the students’ progress in the STEM program, and wanted to demonstrate their knowledge to state officials. As a result, they invited the Lt. governor –at 41 the youngest governor in the nation - to the school on Hilton Road in Brighton Twp. for a demonstration. Afterward, Calley told WHMI he was impressed by how bright and responsive the kids are, especially considering their ages. 9-year-old Nimrie Ramsdell, a Hilton 4th grader, says that there are many advanced items the students can fashion out of the electronic components available. Supt. Greg Gray says if the proposed bond issue passes next year, the district will be reserving about $10 million of it for STEM and STEAM initiatives at all district schools. (TT)

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    In recognition of "No-Shave November", Brighton City Police Dept. officers are refraining from shaving for the next couple of months in order to raise awareness of the many different kinds of cancer and those who are imnpacted by the disease. The purpose of No Shave November is for those who participate in the effort to donate the money they normally would use to get a haircut or groom their facial hair to St. Jude or other cancer research charities. At the Brighton Police Dept., the officers donating the proceeds to Wigs 4 Kids, which provides custom wigs for children. Police Chief Rob Bradford tells WHMI he’s extending the fund-raiser by one month through December so that more donations will be realized. No-Shave November began after a father in Chicago passed away from colon cancer. His 8 sons and daughters started the campaign in 2009 in honor of their father. Over the last several years this has become a popular thing to do among many persons throughout the country. Bradford says at the end of the month he’ll award the officer in the Brighton Police Dept. with the best beard with a gift card. Bradford says the public can also donate by going to wigs4kids.org/donate-hair. (TT)

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    Brighton’s CoBACH Center, which historically was the village hall located next to the Mill Pond, will be re-opening soon. The Brighton City Council voted to spend up to $10,000 to make repairs and fix the water leakage problem that has kept it closed for the last few months. Several summertime or fall events, such as the Livingston Players’ recent “Politics As Usual” play and a Brighton Area Historical Society event – were forced either to be postponed or moved to another location. Historical Society President Jim Vichich told council the reason for the closure was a 2-inch-plus rain that fell in a matter of a couple of hours this summer, which resulted in basement flooding. City DPW Director Marcel Goch said the result was mold spores getting into the building, particularly the basement. He says the building will have to be thoroughly cleaned and sanitized to kill the spores, and in addition, a new dehumidifier will need to be purchased along with installing a microbial filtration unit and other steps taken to ensure the safety of anyone entering the building. Mayor Jim Muzzin said that there are three tenants who need the building for their events – the Brighton Art Guild, the historical society and the theater group. And, although they pay only a dollar a year to lease their portion of the building, they each pay $1,400 per year in insurance. Council Member Jon Emaus said as a state-certified historical site, high standards must be maintained and the city must follow specific guidelines in the restoration of the building, which could push the price tag up to $70,000 or more. Nonetheless, members approved a motion for the DPW to solicit bids to spend not more than $10,000 on the cleanup and initial restoration, with the caveat that they hope the ultimate cost won’t be any higher. (TT)

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    The Livingston County United Way has released its yearly wish lists for local nonprofit organizations that could use a little help during the holiday season. This marks the 25th year that the Livingston County United Way has been gathering “wish lists” from area non-profits. With the holidays approaching, officials say now is the time of year people start considering ways to get involved and help local families and agencies. 37 local nonprofit organizations hope to be considered during the holiday season, and throughout the year. Many lists include practical items needed to help local organizations provide strong community programming, while offsetting operating costs. In some cases, “gently” used items may be donated such as office equipment, furniture or supplies. The “Filling Wishes” booklet can be viewed through the link. (JM)

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    Voters will head to the polls Tuesday and with large turnout expected, some can expect to encounter lines depending on what time they go. As for the spike in turnout, Livingston County Clerk Elizabeth Hundley thinks that overall people are interested in the political process right now. She tells WHMI people are passionate on multiple fronts, whether it be relate to a particular party or topic. She says that historically mid-term elections run right around 50 to 52% voter turnout. In comparison, she says they’re expecting close to 80% on Tuesday. Knowing there will be heavier turnout and in anticipation of voters coming out, Livingston County Elections Coordinator Joe Bridgman says they want to make sure everyone is prepared and ready to go. He notes voters will first fill out a small application and then should be prepared to have their license or photo ID out. If you do not have photo ID, you can still cast a ballot by signing an affidavit. Bridgman tells WHMI there are a number of resources available on the county clerk’s website to preview individual ballots and read proposals word for word. He advises voters take the time to review offices and proposals on the ballot so they can be prepared before heading to the polls. Sample ballots are available for voters on the Livingston County Clerk’s website, a link for which is below. Meanwhile, Hundley says new election equipment purchased in 2017 is working out very well but there are a couple of things officials want local voters to be aware of on Election Day. Once the election inspector has removed the stub from the ballot and the voter is approaching the tabulator to cast their vote, she says the ballot needs to be out of the top approximately 1 ½ to 2 inches so the scan can grip the ballot and pull it through. Hundley says if the voter feels more comfortable, once they are right in front of the tabulator, they can remove the ballot from the secrecy sleeve and feed it in so it doesn’t get tied up. If the ballot is not out far enough, then the scan can’t grab it. Hundley tells WHMI they ask that voters remain at the tabulator until the flag of the United States pops up and they actually see that their vote has been cast and counted. Hundley says election inspectors will be instructing voters on Election Day to watch for that flag as well. (JM)

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