Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

WHMI 93.5 FM Radio Station for Livingston County Michigan with News, Traffic, and Weather Service for Howell and Brighton

older | 1 | .... | 684 | 685 | (Page 686) | 687 | 688 | .... | 767 | newer

    0 0

    The Pinckney Community Public Library’s 5th annual fundraiser is set. Pinckney in May: Bids, Bites, Beats, and Books is the name for this year’s version of the yearly fundraiser in support of the library. Music, food, and a silent auction full of items from local and state-wide merchants highlight the event. Popular local act, the Midnight Special Band, will be playing their brand of classic rock and blues from the 70’s. The Huron River Revivalists and Pinckney High School’s Jazz Rats will also perform for the benefit of the library. Food will be available featuring local pizza, while beer and wine will be served at a cash bar. The silent auction features items like season passes to Six Flags Amusement Park, NASCAR tickets for Michigan International Speedway, a wine tasting getaway in Traverse City, and a Waldenwoods Resort membership valued at $1,300. Attendees can also bid on several packages from local merchants including jewelry, car care kits, and gift certificates to many establishments in the area. The Friends of Library have included an iPad to be raffled off. Raffle tickets can be purchased beginning May 11th, up to the day of the event, which is Saturday, May 19th. Entry to the event is free and it is asked that guests be 21 or older to attend. For more information and a preview of all items up for auction, visit www.pinckneyinmay.weebly.com. (MK)

    0 0

    The Pinckney Community Schools Board of Education is looking for a new member. In response to the resignation of Trustee Rob Guilloz, the board is considering applications to fill the vacancy. The candidate appointed to the position will serve a term from the date of appointment through November, 2018. Any qualified resident of the Pinckney Community Schools district interested in being considered for filling the vacancy should submit an application to Superintendent Rick Todd. Applicants must be at least 18 years of age, a citizen of the United States; a resident of the State of Michigan and a registered voter of the Pinckney Community Schools district. Applications are available on the district website and must be received no later than 4pm Friday, May 18th. A link is provided, and the application is attached. The Board of Education is scheduled to interview finalists in open session at the regular meeting on Thursday, May 24th at 7pm, and anticipates appointing a candidate to the seat at that same night. (JM) The application must be received by the Superintendent via email to Rick Todd rtodd@pinckneypirates.org or via mail to the Board of Education office as follows: Superintendent of Schools Pinckney Community Schools 2130 East M-36, Pinckney, Michigan 48169

    0 0

    A local friend of a library is one of a select few that have won an award from the Library of Michigan. Pinckney Village Council President Linda Lavey was named the Trustee/Friend Award winner during the Library of Michigan’s 2018 Loleta Fyan Small and Rural Libraries Conference this past Monday in Traverse City. The conference brings together more than 500 library staff members for three days of workshops, speakers, and exhibits, bi-annually. A Friend of the Library since 2003, the Library of Michigan recognized Lavey as playing an important part in campaigning for the passage of a successful bond millage for the library in Pinckney. She has also written numerous grants for the library. Pinckney Library Director Hope Siasoco said that Lavey has been an integral part of the library’s history. Siasoco continued, saying she has repeatedly shown her dedication by sharing her time, talent, creativity, and resources with the library. (MK)

    0 0

    Handy Township wants community input on potentially granting tax abatement for a corporation that plans to construct a test track for autonomous vehicles. Aisin Holdings of America, an automotive parts supplier with a location in Handy Township, plans to add the track to test driver-less vehicles to the FT Techno of America facility at the Fowlerville Proving Grounds. Aisin applied for an Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificate, which requires a public hearing. Township officials recently set a date for the hearing, which is Thursday, May 31st at 5:30pm at Township Hall, during which community members will hear about the proposed project and have the opportunity to share their thoughts on the company potentially receiving the abatement. Community members’ input at the public hearing could influence the township’s decision to grant the abatement or not. Aisin would need to receive approval from the state’s Tax Commission as well. The abatement would reduce the amount of taxes paid by Aisin on the area being developed for a set period of time; usually 50% of the project cost for 12 years. Construction, track and equipment included, is expected to cost approximately $5(m) million. Township Supervisor Ed Alverson says the abatement would allow a good corporation in the community to further invest into the area, encouraging local development and job creation. He feels overall it would be a positive thing as the benefits would include increasing the property’s taxable value, which is much more than the currently vacant land's is. The track will measure autonomous vehicles’ performance in detecting and avoiding collisions with pedestrians, bicycles, and other vehicles in a variety of environments. Project leaders want to break ground in June and previously said they hope to complete the facility by late fall. (DK)

    0 0

    An entrepreneur and former professional dancer and actor in Hollywood wants to convert a vacant, former Mexican restaurant in Brighton into a combination country music dance hall, restaurant and lounge. The food, drink and entertainment venue would be called Single Barrel Social. Live, modern country music and food with a Southwest flavor would be featured. Christopher Klebba purchased the former Border Cantina in January. City Manager Nate Geinzer tells WHMI that his application for a liquor license transfer will go before the City Council tonight for consideration. Klebba is on a fast track, and the site plan will go before the City Planning Commission at its next meeting, on May 21st. In order to convert the former Mexican restaurant into the kind of venue he foresees, Klebba wants to change the façade of the building and add a thousand feet of space. He envisions a raised dance floor on one side and a lounge and bar on the other, and has retained Ron & Roman Architects of Birmingham as his architectural firm for the necessary renovations. Klebba, who would be making an investment of about $3 million, hopes to start construction as soon as plans are approved. He would like to have the new business venture open for business by next winter at the latest. (TT)

    0 0

    A number of large recycling opportunities will be available to Livingston County residents over the next few months. With many people spring cleaning this time of year, disposing of old junk can become a problem. For those interested in doing away with it in an ecological fashion there are a series of events beginning soon and running into the fall. This Saturday, from 9am to noon, in Howell is the first for those looking to get rid of household hazardous items. This includes chemicals from bath, kitchen, garage, auto, and garden. Sharp items, fluorescent tubes, batteries, thermometers, aerosol cans and more will also be accepted. Items not accepted are latex paint, containers larger than 5 gallons, propane tanks larger than 1 pound, tires, radioactive material, biohazardous waste, and explosives or ammunition. An appointment is required, after which the location will be revealed to the resident. If this Saturday is too soon, a similar event will be held in Green Oak Township on July 28th, and another in Howell on September 22nd. Register by calling (517) 545-9609. Residents and small business owners will also have 2 opportunities to get rid of their e-waste. This includes televisions, computers, cell phones, game systems, microwaves and more. The first of these events is on May 19th, with other happening October 6th. It will take place at the Livingston County East Complex in Howell from 9am to 1pm. No appointment is required for this location. A spare tire recycling event is happening on August 18th, from 9am to 1pm. Livingston County residents wishing to dispose of passenger or light truck tires can do so after pre-registering. Call (517) 545-9609 or email solidwaste@livgov.com to do so. Limit 10 tires per residential address. Visit www.livgov.com/dpw for more information. (MK)

    0 0

    A Brighton citizens’ group has been holding a series of meetings in an effort to inform people about the upcoming Headlee override issue that will be on the August primary ballot. A successful Headlee override would bring in $1.85 million per year in new revenue to be used exclusively to upgrade the streets and roads. The third meeting was held Wednesday evening at the Chamber of Commerce building in Brighton. City Council Member Susan Gardner, one of the organizers of the group, told WHMI that such meetings are being held to inform city voters about what a Headlee override means and the reason why the override is needed. A survey of city streets in 2016 showed that 75% are either in poor or failing condition. The problem is that the city doesn’t have the funds to fix the streets and needs to have an additional funding source. Those attending were told that as a result of the recession, property values dropped precariously in the city, so that it wasn’t realizing the revenues needed to keep the streets in good condition, let alone to run day-to-day city operations, without major cutbacks. However, although the recession is now over, the Headlee Amendment prevents the city from realizing the benefits of the rising tax values. That’s because it limits tax increases to the cost of living index or the inflation rate – whichever is lower. It was pointed out that a Headlee override, which would equate to 4.346 mills, would merely bring the city tax rate to the amount listed in the city charter which was approved by the voters back in 1957. The City Council is strongly considering putting a Sunset clause on the override, most likely 15 years, which means that if approved by the voters, the override would expire after the 15 years are up. The City Council is expected to take up the issue of having an expiration date on the override at tonight’s meeting. (TT)

    0 0

    Spring has finally sprung and the farmers market will return to downtown Howell this weekend. This Sunday marks the opening of the Howell Farmers’ Market. The popular market features a mini-festival atmosphere and is held on State and Clinton Streets, adjacent to the historic Livingston County Courthouse in the heart of downtown. Opening day festivities will include live entertainment and a petting zoo attraction on Clinton Street. Nearly 100 vendors offer everything from flowers and produce to crafts and specialty products. The market is open from 9am to 2pm every Sunday May 6th through October 28th. For more information on Howell’s Sunday Farmers’ Market, visit the provided link. (JM)

    0 0

    The Brighton-area community is rallying around a young girl after she received a devastating medical diagnosis. 12-year-old Emma Roberts attends Maltby Intermediate School in Brighton. Several weeks ago she entered C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in Ann Arbor and was initially diagnosed with a case of double pneumonia. But after blood tests came back, doctors confirmed she had Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, a type of cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many immature lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. Family friend Janice Buckley tells WHMI that after letting that stunning development sink in, they quickly mobilized to try and support Emma both emotionally and financially as she battles the disease, including selling t-shirts that say #EmmaRobertsStrong to help raise awareness for children's cancer, specifically leukemia, but also in hopes that the community will rally together. “Emma Roberts is an active, loving and very funny girl. Always seen with a smile, and a giggle not far behind! But more than that, she is a fighter! And boy has the fight of her life been tested. We know #emmawillfightandwin! But this will be a long road ahead for the Roberts, but specifically for our sweet girl!” Proceeds from the fundraiser, which runs through May 20th, will be used towards medical assistance, as well as future needs for Emma, and a portion of the proceeds will also go towards Mott Children’s Hospital. They are also asking everyone to use the hashtag #EmmaRobertsStrong on social media with a picture of them wearing one of the shirts. You’ll find the link below. (JK)

    0 0

    A long-standing staple within the Fowlerville Community School district will continue to aid in maintaining a safe setting on campus. Handy Township officials unanimously voted Wednesday to renew their contract, which calls for a financial contribution in order to allow Sgt. Jeff Soli of the Fowlerville Police Department to continue his role as the district’s Liaison Officer. The position is funded through a cost-sharing agreement, with partnering municipalities each contributing $10,000. The school district contracts with Handy, Conway and Iosco Township, and the Village of Fowlerville. Handy Township Supervisor Ed Alverson says Sgt. Soli has held the position since the late 90s’, when the program was first implemented by the Village of Fowlerville Police Department and the Fowlerville Community School District. The SLO has an office on campus and works directly with school administrators to ensure a safe and orderly environment by enforcing criminal laws and assisting staff with non-criminal violations. (DK) Facebook Photo.

    0 0

    A two-day event in Howell Township will bring over 2,600 high school students from across the state to learn about skilled trade opportunities. Construction Career Day was held Thursday and again today at the Operating Engineers Local 324 Training and Education Center off of M-59. Now in its 11th year, the event hosted students from about 80 school districts, as well as representatives from contracting partners, various agencies, and colleges with construction curriculum. In addition to speaking with those representatives, students were able to get a look at OE 324’s 515-acre facility and operate some of the construction equipment under the direct guidance of professionals from all sectors of the industry. Communications Director Dan McKernan says they are seeking the “workers of tomorrow” by trying to identify next generation and get them interested early on, due to the industry's need for skilled workers. He says it's part of an ongoing, coordinated effort with other trades and the State of Michigan. Training Coordinator for OE Local 324, John Osika, says there's significant value in introducing students to different skilled trades and potentially setting them on a path toward a wealth of related careers. Democrat Elissa Slotkin, a candidate for the 8th Congressional District seat, attended Thursday’s event and praised OE 324 as a center for connecting students to potential and substantial careers. The OE 324 recently announced their endorsement of Slotkin, citing her commitment to rebuilding the nation’s infrastructure and maintaining prevailing wage laws. (DK/JK)

    0 0

    An annual event to benefit Gleaners Community Food Bank is returning this weekend and organizers are setting big goals. The Livingston County Association of Realtors will hold its 16th annual Food Drive this Saturday from 9am to 1pm. The food drive is said to be the largest in the county and there are several drop-off sites for those interested in donating food or money. Over 50 local realtors and affiliate members will be collecting food and funds at Kroger, VG’s and Walmart in Howell, Busch’s and the Legacy Center in Brighton. LCAR President Pam Zimmerlee tells WHMI realtors from all over come together for the cause and to rally against hunger in the community and make a difference in the lives of those in need. She says the food drive began in 2003 based on a great need and it’s heartwarming to see all of the generosity from the community each year to help fellow neighbors in need. Especially with school letting out soon and kids being home, Zimmerlee says it’s even more important to help Gleaners since kids won’t be getting lunch at school. The Livingston County Association of Realtors has raised $17,000 towards the goal of $20,000 and 5,000 pounds of food for Gleaners. Some suggested items include canned meats and vegetables, jelly and soups as well as cereal. Monetary donations can also be made online. A link for that is provided. (JM)

    0 0

    The Brighton City Council surprised some people at its meeting Thursday night and voted to place a 10-year limit on the Headlee override ballot issue. Brighton Voters will be going to the polls in August to cast ballots on a request to override the Headlee Amendment so that the city can levy the full 20-mills authorized under the city charter. The city currently levies about 15.65 mills. The $1.85 million in annual revenues derived from the extra tax money would be used to upgrade city streets, which overall are in a state of serious disrepair. According to Headlee, taxes cannot exceed the rate of inflation or 5%– and must go according to the lower of those two figures. Initially, the Headlee override request had no expiration date, meaning if passed, it could continue in perpetuity. But in getting feedback from the public, council realized that a sunset clause – or termination date –would have to be put on the ballot question if it had any chance of passing. Staff asked for a 15-year term on the millage, and while a few on council favored that, others came out in favor of a shorter term. And member Jim Bohn urged a lower amount of 2 mills be placed on the override. After lengthy discussion, council voted unanimously to ask the voters for a 4.3-mill override over 10 years. The city will be holding public informational town hall meetings on the Headlee override issue in the coming weeks. According to City Manager Nate Geinzer, those meetings will take place on June 13th and 27th, and July 11th and 25th, all of them at 6 p.m. The locations haven’t yet been finalized, but when that happens the city will let the public know through the local news media, including WHMI, and through social media. (TT)

    0 0

    A well-known political analyst and conservative media commentator will headline the Livingston County Republican Party’s annual Lincoln Day Dinner. Army Major Pete Hegseth will serve as the keynote speaker during the 2018 Lincoln Day Dinner on Thursday, May 24th at the Crystal Gardens Banquet Center in Genoa Township. Hegseth is the co-host of Fox & Friends Weekend but also frequently appears as a guest co-host for Fox & Friends during the week. He is the senior political analyst for Fox News after having served in Afghanistan and Iraq, earning two Bronze Stars and Combat Infantryman’s Badge. The dinner will also feature John James as the master of ceremonies; a combat veteran and businessman who is running for the United States Senate. A VIP reception will be held prior to the dinner from 5:30 – 6:30pm. Tickets, tables and event sponsorships are available and can be purchased online through the link below or by calling Meghan Reckling at (517) 672-6823. (JK)

    0 0

    Officials in Green Oak Township continue to amend their marijuana laws to be consistent with the state’s. After introducing their latest Medical Marijuana Zoning Ordinance Amendment last month, the Green Oak Township Board of Trustees made it official at Wednesday night’s meeting. Township Supervisor Mark St. Charles said this puts Green Oak in step with the state’s laws on where medical marijuana can be grown. The key change to the amendment is the striking out of language that prohibits medical marijuana growing in accessory structures. Currently under Michigan law, caregivers are allowed to grow 12 plants for themselves and each of 5 patients, totaling a potential 72 plants in a detached structure. St. Charles said that the majority of calls they get on marijuana are around residents complaining about the smell coming from a neighbor’s grow operation. The supervisor said if they check out the complaint and the resident growing has all the proper paperwork and is under or at their allowed limit, there is nothing they can do. St. Charles said the township is still choosing to opt out of allowing the larger provisioning centers and dispensaries. The amendment passed by a 5-1 vote with Clerk Mike Sedlak dissenting. Sedlak has said in the past that his vote against the amendment is more of a statement of the flaws he sees in the state law.(MK)

    0 0

    A Brighton woman who survived an assault 25 years ago is sharing how she overcame the obstacles and trauma it created in her life. On her way home from work in 1993, Wendy Jo Morrison was kidnapped at gunpoint and sexually assaulted before managing her escape. With a new perspective on life, she followed her dream of joining the Peace Corps. After completing her service and working successfully back state-side as a high level executive, Morrison was diagnosed with Multiple System Atrophy, or MSA in 2010. MSA is a terminal disease with no known cause, cure or remission. The brain stops telling what the body to do, and Morrison reached a point where she lost movement in her arms and legs and was paralyzed for hours at time each day. Believing her disease may have been caused by the trauma and stress earlier in her life, Morrison went on a mission to search for natural, alternate healing. It was in Greece that she discovered Biodynamic Breath and Trauma Release, or BBTR. She says the technique has existed for thousands of years and changes the body’s chemistry. Morrison said she has used it to ween herself off of 27 different medications, and while diagnosed with a terminal disease, is still “standing here.” Doctors back home, Morrison said, say they tell her they don’t know what she doing, but to keep doing it because it’s working. Now, the only person in the United States with certification in this, Morrison is using it to help others work through their trauma. She has founded the non-profit organization, UBU Today, and is helping victims get their lives back. She said that trauma is devastating on many levels, but can also act as a doorway to personal growth and healing. Their workshops, she says, create an opportunity for people to uncover and let go of the effects trauma has had on their life. Morrison says that many times people don’t consciously know that they are holding on to trauma. She continued by saying that BBTR is effective for more than just trauma sufferers. People dealing with anxiety, low self-esteem, grief, loss, identity, or those who just want to feel better can draw benefits from it, she says. Morrison said the lives they are helping and the work they are doing far outweighs the judgement society takes on her for using this holistic approach. Earlier this week she was recognized by Governor Rick Snyder as a winner of the 2018 Governor’s Service Award. Morrison was named Volunteer of the Year for her work and advocacy to survivors. She, and other award winners, will be honored in a ceremony on June 5th in East Lansing. Morrison will be a guest on WHMI’s Viewpoint this Sunday morning at 8:30. Morrison says that UBU Today currently offers individual Breathwork sessions and workshops to victims of trauma and their support systems. Specifically, they have built partnerships with LACASA in Livingston County, Wayne County Safe, Michigan State Police (MSP) & Prosecuting Attorneys Association of Michigan (PAAM). She also says the Larry Nassar scandal at MSU has brought tremendous local awareness to people using their voices. She was recently introduced as a "Senior Survivor" to those impacted by Nassar's crimes and says UBU Today is currently working with those more than 150 survivors to assist them by offering specifically tailored workshops. (MK/JK)

    0 0

    A Fowlerville man has been charged with assaulting two police officers following an incident last weekend. The Livingston County Prosecutor’s office authorized four felony charges against 35-year-old Robert McKee; two counts of assault with a dangerous weapon and two counts of assaulting/resisting/obstructing a police officer. Members of the Michigan State Police First District Special Investigation Section handled the investigation into the incident that occurred on Sunday, April 29th when a trooper from the MSP Brighton Post and an officer from Fowlerville Police Department responded to a call a involving a suicidal subject in Handy Township. When they arrived on scene, police say McKee had already injured himself with a knife and was hiding in the basement of the residence. Police say officers were able to make contact with him and call for an ambulance but when they attempted to render aid, he became combative and moved towards them with the knife. The Fowlerville officer shot the man to stop the threat. One bullet ricocheted and struck the trooper in the leg. McKee was arraigned on the charges today at the University of Michigan Hospital, where he is receiving treatment for his injuries. Magistrate Sherwood gave McKee a $10,000 personal recognizance bond as he is recovering in the hospital. (JM)

    0 0

    A tree fell on a U.S. postal worker delivering mail this morning in South Lyon. The postal worker was delivering mail around 11:45am in the 100-200 block of North Wells Street when he was struck by a falling tree caused by the high winds, trapping him. South Lyon Police Lt. Chris Sovik tells WHMI the postal worker was successfully extricated by the South Lyon Fire Department and then transported to Novi Providence Park Hospital by Huron Valley Ambulance. The man was said to be conscious, breathing and talking before being transported. Sovik says they contacted the hospital to check on the man and he is going to be fine. He was last listed in stable condition. Meanwhile, the high winds are toppling trees and power lines, cutting power to more than 230,000 homes and businesses. There are scattered power outages reported throughout Livingston County. Consumers Energy and DTE Energy are working to restore service but exact restoration times vary by region. Both utilities remind people to stay at least 25 feet away from downed wires and anything they may be touching. There have also been various reports of downed trees throughout the county due to the high winds. Motorists should use caution when traveling due to blowing debris but also tree hazards in more rural areas locally. Photo: South Lyon Fire Department. (JM)

    0 0

    The Brighton City Council has given its city manager what was termed a “very good-to-excellent” evaluation after his second year at the helm. At the April 5th meeting, council evaluated City Manager Nate Geinzer in closed session, and the results were released Thursday night after the regular meeting. Mayor Jim Muzzin says Geinzer did exceptionally well in areas such as communication skills, general job performance and productivity. He says the main area in which council felt there could be improvement was in management skills. Geinzer started out as an intern for the city and later was employed part-time in the community development dept. and then as Principal Shopping District consultant. After graduating from Eastern Michigan University with a degree in public administration, he worked for the city of Farmington Hills as assistant to the city manager. He has made Brighton his home for the last 14 years. (TT)

    0 0

    An event next week aims to celebrate the school commute and encourage more families to safely try out riding to school on one day each spring. Bike to School Day is set for Wednesday, May 9th. The annual event, in which more than 150 schools across Michigan participate, is part of a larger national movement for year-round safe routes to school. It also emphasizes the importance of increasing physical activity for children. The Howell Area Parks and Recreation Authority will again host a friendly competition among buildings in the Howell district, encouraging as many kids as possible to wear a helmet, get on their bikes and ride to school. Parks and Rec staff will then go around to the different schools on Wednesday and count the number of bikes piled up around the racks outside to determine which school wins the 2018 Bike to School trophy. The winning school will receive a trophy as well as a coupon code voucher for discount registration for August’s Doc May Memorial Melon Ride. (JK)

older | 1 | .... | 684 | 685 | (Page 686) | 687 | 688 | .... | 767 | newer