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WHMI 93.5 FM Radio Station for Livingston County Michigan with News, Traffic, and Weather Service for Howell and Brighton

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    The 10th annual Christmas in the Ville will light up Downtown Fowlerville this weekend with a glow that organizers say can be seen for miles. More than 40 balloonists will be taking part in the event, set to take place Saturday, December 1st. Event Organizer Steve MacDermaid says while the highlight is the parade at 6pm, the events get underway early with a balloon launch scheduled for 8am, weather permitting, as well as a scavenger hunt for kids, Santa’s workshop, treat decorating, story time in the window, real reindeer, a balloon sculptor, chili sold by the fire department and a 5k Dashing through the Snow and 1k fun walk for kids. If the weather permits, a second balloon launch will take place at 2pm. Last year about 15,000 people descended on Fowlerville for the event and MacDermaid says the addition of shuttle services last year proved to be a big help. You’ll find complete details through the link below. (JK)

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    The city of Brighton will be getting a monetary shot in the arm from the Brighton Downtown Development Authority for the next several years. The DDA Board, meeting last week in monthly session, voted to contribute 18% of its annual budget to the city to bolster its general fund. The annual supplement won’t go into effect until the 2020-21 fiscal year since the DDA has financial commitments it must meet in the coming year. Although the annual contribution could go up or down — depending on the DDA’s revenues in any of the six years — the amount is expected to rise slowly. According to City Manager Nate Geinzer, if the additional funds were to start this year, the 18% would amount to about $160,000. Geinzer had originally asked for a commitment up to the year 2045, when the DDA’s life will come to an end without an extension, but the board hesitated to commit funds so far into the future. Still, Geinzer was pleased with the DDA’s action. He called it “a good compromise which meets the purpose of the request.” The city manager also called the DDA commitment “confirmation of the strong working relationship between the DDA and the city.” Geinzer says he is not required to bring the DDA action to council for a final vote, saying it will simply be made a part of the 20-21 city budget when it's adopted. (TT)

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    The price tag of the bond issue likely to go before voters in the Brighton Area School District next year has just gone up. The Board of Education, meeting in regular session Monday night, decided that the original $45 million discussed in earlier meetings would not be sufficient to cover all of the district’s needs and it would need to be increased to about $53 million. The consensus on the board was that a major component of the bond issue will be $10 million for a STEAM center for every school in the district. STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics. By definition, STEAM is an educational approach to learning that uses all of those disciplines as access points for guiding student curiosity, dialogue, and critical thinking. The end result, ideally, is students who take risks, learn by experience, engage in problem-solving, develop a sense of collaboration with their peers and work through the creative process. The theory is that students who have had a STEAM-based education will become the innovators, educators and leaders of the future. The board was told that if the bond amount is increased by $8 million it will still not result in an increase in the current district millage of 7.19 mills, but could result in the bond payout being extended up to one year longer. Among other likely items on the bond issue will be parking lot repaving, new boilers and all-new water fountains in district schools. The high school would be getting many of the upgrades from a bond issue including roof replacement, new acoustical tile, replacement of the corridor flooring and four new boilers. The total cost of the high school projects alone would be $17 million. The board will make a final determination on the amount and date of the bond at its next meeting, on Dec. 10. (TT)

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    This Saturday marks the 30th anniversary of World AIDS Day and Livingston County residents are being encouraged to get tested. Recognized worldwide to raise awareness, fight prejudice, and improve education about HIV and AIDS, the Livingston County Health Department says it is also a day to support those living with HIV and remember those who have died from the infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that there are 36.7 million people living with HIV worldwide, more than 1.1 million of them in the United States. Of those, more than 16,000 are in Michigan and 102 are Livingston County residents. On average, HIV is spread to 50,000 people in the U.S. every year. This year’s theme is “Know Your Status” and to help achieve that, the Livingston County Health Department is offering an extra day of free, confidential or anonymous rapid HIV testing from 1-3pm. Appointments are encouraged, but walk-ins are welcome. Test results will be given within 20-30 minutes. The CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of 13-64 get tested for HIV at least once. To make an appointment or for questions about other testing days, call (517) 552-9850. (JK)

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    A construction services agreement for the first phase of Fillmore County Park has received preliminary approval. On Monday night, the Public Safety and Infrastructure Development Committee of the Livingston County Board of Commissioners met and approved the agreement with Myers Excavating of Brighton. It needs some final approvals. The agreement will be before the Finance Committee Wednesday, and if approved, will head to the County Board of Commissioners for final approval. Livingston County Planning Director Kathleen Kline-Hudson tells WHMI they’re looking to approve a construction services agreement with the second lowest bidder for phase one development at the park. She noted this was their second attempt to provide an agreement with an excavating company. Kline Hudson says they had approved a contract with the lowest bidder and approached them to sign, only to learn that they were going out of business, hence why they are now proceeding with the second lowest bid. Fillmore County Park is located midway between the cities of Howell and Brighton at corner of Kellogg and McClements Road in Genoa Township. Construction is expected to begin this coming spring. Kline-Hudson says it shouldn’t take long at all and they’re hoping to have the park open by summer. She says there is currently nothing on the land so this will be the first phase of development. Construction involves an entrance drive, parking lot, restroom facilities, a 5K trail, wayfinding signage and other trails. A multi-purpose sports field is mostly marked for soccer, baseball and softball. Kline-Hudson noted the project has been a real collaborative effort with significant financial assistance from Genoa Township, the City of Howell and Marion Township as well as the Livingston County Board of Commissioners and the Livingston County Foundation - a 501-C-3, which initially enabled individuals to bequeath land to the county but now allows different designations for donations. Giving opportunities toward Livingston County parks and recreation can be made through the Livingston County Foundation. That link is provided. (JM)

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    The City of South Lyon’s Board of Ethics is being asked to conduct an investigation into one of the municipality’s city council members who reportedly made inappropriate comments about another member. Council Member Mary Parisien informed those in attendance at City Council’s Monday meeting that on October 31st, she was contacted by a local business informing her that Council Member Carl Richards had made comments at the business about Parisien’s sexuality, body and the way she dresses. Richards also reportedly bragged about looking into the windows of Parisien’s home, described it “in detail”, and made what Parisien says was “discriminatory comments about the LGBTQ community”. As a result, Parisien sought a Personal Protection Order (PPO) against Richards, which an Oakland County Circuit Court judge granted on Monday. Part of the PPO stipulated that while Richards has a right to attend council meetings for business matters, he must be as far away from Parisien as possible for the next year. Richards sat at the back of the room for the entirety of the meeting. The Oakland County Sheriff’s Office is also conducting a separate criminal investigation into Richards. At council’s meeting, Parisien made a motion requesting that the city’s Board of Ethics conduct an investigation into Richards to determine if he had violated the Ethics Ordinance. The motion passed four to two, with Council Members Rose Walton and Margaret Kurtzweil opposing. Kurztweil feels the Board of Ethics is being over-utilized noting, "This is the second time that the Board of Ethics has been requested and I'm almost beginning to believe that that commission is starting to become "weaponized" and becoming an organization that people are very quick to send things to because they have an issue, or a bone to pick, or an agenda...So I would like to get all of my eggs in one place, I would like to see the report that's going to come out of Oakland County." Kurtzweil also suggested that Richards' comments were protected by the First Amendment and a form of free speech stating, "As far as I'm concerned this was kind of a...individual in his private life, in a private conversation with a business owner, which blew up...So I guess the word of the day is be careful who you talk to. I don't have the information that I think I need in front of me right now to send to the Board of Ethics. I'm not even sure if that is the place this should go. I think the court systems appear to be handling this and maybe that's where this should just stay." But Parisien says the judge who granted her PPO made no effort to hide his dismay of the whole situation and on record, noted that Richards was old enough to be Parisien's grandfather. Parisien reminded that this is not Richards’ first incident related to inappropriate comments made towards women. During public interviews in January for a vacant council seat, Richards persistently asked one candidate about whether she had recently had a baby. Richards as a result was required to attend diversity training in September, which Parisien says must've not worked, since Richards made the comments about her the very next month. Parisien also stated that she does not feel Richards should sit on council adding, "It is important to note that as a public figure, I expect individuals to have an opinion of their governing officials. However Carl is not just a public citizen. Carl is a colleague who sits at this table alongside me. As such, he needs to be held to a higher standard. Harassing a fellow council member by peering into my home, and proceeding to visit local businesses in our community to spread malicious lies is uncalled for, unprofessional and reflects poorly on our community." The Board of Ethics will next meet on December 6th. (DK)

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    A plea has been entered by the man charged with a break-in at the Scorpions Motorcycle Club in Lyon Township. 40-year-old Kinley Rae-Thomas Kelm pleaded no contest last week in Oakland County Circuit Court to charges of breaking and entering with intent, larceny of firearms, being a felon in possession of a firearm and two counts of felony firearms. A no contest plea is not an admission of guilt, but is considered as such at sentencing. Police say that on September 22nd, 2017 a fire severely damaged the Scorpions Motorcycle Club headquarters building on Milford Road. A Bobcat belonging to a fence company working a project at the nearby War Dog Memorial was reportedly stolen, driven to the motorcycle club and used to crash through the clubhouse wall and move a large safe. Club members identified Kelm as a suspect in the break-in after noticing him in downtown South Lyon at a fundraiser, wearing a Scorpions shirt that was from a locker inside the clubhouse. When questioned, Kelm reportedly said he was an out of state club member, but couldn’t provide further proof, leading the club member to take his picture and verify he was lying. It’s believed the fire that damaged the clubhouse began when propane lines were damaged by Kelm as he removed the safe. Kelm, who remains jailed on a $100,000 bond, will be sentenced December 19th. (JK)

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    A State Police investigation has been completed into the alleged misappropriation of donated funds by a member of the Livingston County Veterans Services Committee. The investigation began in August after a woman said she was unable to obtain documentation for a $400 check she wrote Committee Chair Hansel Keene in October of 2017. Livingston County Prosecutor Bill Vailliencourt says his office has received the report from the Michigan State Police, but could not give a time frame on when a decision will be made on whether or not charges will be filed in the case. The donor says when she wrote out the check to the Livingston County Veterans Department, Keene instructed her to include his name on the check, alleging he was authorized to cash county checks and could more easily deposit it. The woman says that over the next 9 months, every time she asked about the receipt Keene would repeatedly say he forgot it, finally leading her to contact then-Veterans Services Director Adam Smiddy on August 22nd. But Smiddy was fired by the committee five days later, he says in retaliation for his efforts to determine exactly what happened to the donation. His position was recently filled by Mary Durst of Brighton, a Coast Guard veteran, whose appointment by the committee was unanimously ratified earlier this month by the Livingston County Board of Commissioners. As to the missing donation, a check for $400 was eventually provided to the donor’s attorney by the law firm of Kevin Nagle, a fellow member of the veterans committee, who said he was representing Mr. Keene. Documents obtained by WHMI through a Freedom of Information Act request indicated Nagle received seven disbursements made from the Veterans Services Relief Fund to either himself or his law firm between May of 2016 and February of 2017 totaling $4,900. While the payments were ostensibly for veteran-related legal representation, they raised questions about the propriety of a committee member receiving payments approved by a committee that he sits on. Meanwhile, the terms of Keene and fellow committee member Joe Riker are due to expire next month. While the county has advertised for volunteers to join the committee, Livingston County Administrator Ken Hinton says it does not indicate either is actually leaving the committee, but rather that they are legally required to post the positions per Michigan law, MCL 35.621(4). (JK/JM)

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    Winners have been announced in Downtown Howell’s annual holiday storefront decorating contest. This marked the 5th year of the “Deck the Windows” contest that helps kickoff the holiday season and further beautify downtown. This year's theme was 'The Night Before Christmas' and two businesses win the friendly competition by collecting the most votes for 'People's Choice' or being selected as the best storefront by Mayor Nick Proctor to win the 'Mayor's Choice' Award. Kelley Decoste of Masters Touch was the People's Choice Award Winner, while EnCore 118 Custom Furnishings & Boutique was the Mayor's Choice Award Winner. The storefront decorating promotion is a public voting contest held in conjunction with Howell’s annual Fantasy of Lights parade. Businesses decorate their storefront or front door, chimney, rooftops or the entire building. Voting ended Monday. Organizers say the windows all looked amazing and a special thanks is owed to all of the downtown businesses who participated in this year's Holiday Storefront Decorating Contest. (JM)

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    This year marks the 90th anniversary for St. Joseph Mercy Livingston, which first began its work in the City of Howell in the late 1920s’. It was a generous donation from the McPherson family that allowed the city to convert a three-story home into a community hospital. Prior to St. Joe’s arrival, people were treated in their homes while travelers were typically treated at the Livingston County Jail, as it was the only suitable place to do so. St. Joe’s was over capacity by the 1950s’, which prompted The Hospital Authority, a nonprofit organization formed to raise funds and construct a new facility, to purchase 10 acres of land on Byron Road for $10,000 from the McPherson family. The McPherson Community Health Center opened in 1958, and became the first hospital in the state to staff both medical and osteopathic physicians. The health system has continued its growth ever since. John O’Malley, President of St. Joseph Mercy Livingston and Brighton, says St. Joe’s has undergone multiple extensive renovations and expansions over the last 15 years to meet the evolving needs of the community and growing population. O’Malley says the health system has also worked very hard to improve the quality of their services and customer service. O’Malley says while they’ve come a long way, there is clearly more to do, one main goal being to bring back a full service community hospital. O’Malley says “keeping local care local” has been their mission and a big part of their expansion of services. As for future goals, O’Malley says they’re working on their endocrinology and nephrology services, as well as working to bring rheumatology back. He notes the health system hopes to soon be doing robotic urology surgery, adding that there’s “a lot of excitement” for the future as they celebrate ninety years of community care. O’Malley adds that 90 years may have passed, but the health system’s dedication to Livingston County still thrives, thanks to their leaders, caregivers, volunteers and the community. (DK) Photo (courtesy of St. Joseph Mercy Health System): Health care at St. Joseph Mercy Livingston has evolved tremendously from lab work conducted in 1954 (left) to modern-day surgical techniques (right).

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    A crash involving significant injuries shut down westbound Grand River in Genoa Township on Tuesday afternoon. The Livingston County Sheriff’s Office was dispatched to the crash around 3:30pm, which occurred on Grand River by Kellogg Road, near the Grand River Annex. Both drivers involved were hospitalized with what were described as significant injuries according to Sheriff Mike Murphy. He tells WHMI preliminary investigation shows a UPS box truck driven by a 21-year-old Howell man hit a 2005 Ford F-150 driven by a 64-year-old Hartland man. Murphy says both vehicles traveling on westbound Grand River and the F-150 was in the right lane when the UPS driver went over. He says it’s unclear if the UPS driver was turning into a driveway or just merging into the lane, noting that part is still under investigation and they are also relying on witnesses to help determine exactly what happened. Murphy says the Howell man was not wearing seatbelt but the Hartland man was. Alcohol and speed do not appear to be factors in the crash. Both lanes of westbound Grand River were shut down for a time for investigation. Murphy recognized witnesses on the scene saying they were very “Johnny on the spot” in providing first aid, adding it’s a little comforting to know that people actually stopped to help out. The Brighton Area Fire Department and Livingston County EMS assisted crews on scene. Murphy noted that Deputies respond to several crashes a day and sometimes road conditions play a factor and sometimes they do not. He says road conditions had nothing to do with this and it was just a matter of people needing to be aware of their surroundings, what’s going on and pay attention to their driving- which would eliminate some of the crashes. (JM)

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    Officials in Fenton Township have set the list of possible community improvements that could come with help from a grant. The Fenton Township Board of Trustees has approved a list of projects that could be completed through the help of Community Development Block Grant, or CDBG, funding. According to the Tri-County Times, the township is set to receive just over $82,000 in grant money for the next 3 years, going into 2021. Fenton Township’s operations manager and deputy clerk made a recommendation to board that it would be in their best interest to consider demolishing the building at 3095 Thompson Road to reduce property tax liability. The vacant building on that lot used to be Fenton Fast Lane, and has caused debate among board members for months on what to do with it. Another consideration for that parcel would be to renovate it for public use; a project that could include improvements to bathrooms, the parking lot, and building entrances. Paving the intersection of Old Linden Road at Thompson Road is also on the approved list. Similar projects were completed recently at four intersections using the CDBG funds from 2016 to 2018. Barrier-free improvements to improve handicap accessibility and other quality-of-life additions to the Thompson Road Regional Dog Park are a consideration, as well as new ditching and culvert replacements in needed areas of unpaved roads such as Odell Road, Fairbanks Road, and Jennings Road. Jennings Road is also in need of crack sealing, especially in the high-trafficked area between Thompson and Lahring Road. Once the project applications have been successfully completed, the Board of Trustees will discuss further on where to spend the funding. (MK)

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    An Oakland County boy is working hard to raise money to purchase a life-saving device for the Howell Area Fire Department. 9-year-old Lucas Vetter of Rose Township says that on a recent tour of the department’s newly expanded main station, he got to see a hands-free CPR machine in action. While the device is called a LUCAS Chest Compression System, he said it wasn’t the name that drew his attention, but rather seeing how efficiently it performed its task. After seeing the system in action, Lucas went home and used a marker to draw up a business plan on a piece of construction paper to raise the $16,000 needed to purchase one of the devices. The Howell department currently has one such machine, but is hoping to have one installed in each of its four stations. Lucas’ mother Kerry says she and her husband were very impressed by his attention to detail and determination to raise the money. Lucas recently spoke with representatives from the county’s various Rotary groups as well as a local accounting firm. So far he’s raised $500 and is hoping he can eventually reach his goal, although he says every dollar counts. To help in his effort, Lucas has been using a demo machine that was given to him by Stryker, which manufactures the devices. Anyone interested in donating can contact Kerry Vetter at 248-767-0511 and kerrygvetter@gmail.com. (JK)

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    A lawsuit alleging sexual harassment, a hostile work environment and retaliation against Fenton Township and its fire chief won’t be heard for more than a year. The complaint was filed last July in Genesee County Circuit Court on behalf of Firefighter Kristy Polidan and Captain Kirk Stephens. The suit alleges Polidan had been subjected to sexual harassment since she was hired in January 2015 and then retaliated against after she complained to Stephens, who subsequently suspended two firefighters for harassment. The complaint alleges Captain Stephens was subsequently subjected to retaliation for supporting Polidan in her complaint of sexual harassment to township officials. Court records show that a pre-trial hearing was held Tuesday in which a trial date was scheduled for December 10th, 2019. Fire Chief Ryan Volz was initially placed on a paid suspension by the Fenton Township board, but was then placed on unpaid suspension through October 1st. He was also ordered complete sexual harassment and diversity training and transition to an at-will contract. Volz has maintained his innocence and asserts he was falsely accused. (JK)

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    The former head of the embattled Livingston County Veterans Services has filed a lawsuit against the county and the head of the committee that oversees the department. Adam Smiddy was fired by a 4-1 vote of the Livingston County Veterans Services Committee on August 27th. No official reason was provided for his termination by either the committee or county officials. However, Smiddy has maintained his firing was the direct result of his efforts to determine exactly what happened to cash and other items donated to the department by a local resident who said she could not obtain a receipt despite repeated attempts to do so. His lawsuit, filed November 21st in Livingston County Circuit Court, also names Hansel Keene, the chair of the veterans committee. In it, Smiddy says he was contacted August 22nd by a resident who said she written a $400 check to Keene in October of 2017 and made other donations including vacuum cleaners and a riding lawnmower. She said she had repeatedly asked Keene for a receipt, but he had not provided one and requested Smiddy’s help to get it. Smiddy says the following day he made Livingston County Administrator Ken Hinton aware of the complaint and that he suspected Keene has misappropriated the donations. He says Hinton advised him to obtain a copy of the check from the donor. Smiddy says he then contacted Keene, who admitted cashing the check but only using $125 of it for a plaque, while “retaining the balance.” Keene also reportedly said he had “scrapped” the lawnmower and kept the floor cleaners in his garage. Smiddy says he informed Keene he needed to provide a copy of the deposit slip, a receipt for the scrapped lawnmower and return the cleaners. But Smiddy was fired by the committee four days later, he says in retaliation for his efforts to determine exactly what happened to the donation. Smiddy claims his firing was a violation of the Whistleblower’s Protection Act and demands he be reinstated to his position, awarded lost wages as well as damages and attorney fees. He also says his firing was a violation of Michigan Public Policy, which protects public employees from termination for “refusal to violate the law” and for reporting “violations of the standards of conduct for public officers and employees.” The suit, which asks for a jury trial, is assigned to Judge Michael Hatty with a status conference scheduled for May 7th and a trial date set for November 12th of 2019. When contacted for comment on the lawsuit, Smiddy told WHMI that it spoke for itself. Hinton said he had not yet seen the lawsuit. Meanwhile, a State Police investigation has been completed into the donations. Livingston County Prosecutor Bill Vailliencourt says his office has received the report from the Michigan State Police, but could not give a time frame on when a decision will be made on whether or not charges will be filed in the case. As to the missing cash donation, a check for $400 was eventually provided to the donor’s attorney by the law firm of Kevin Nagle, a fellow member of the veterans committee, who said he was representing Mr. Keene. Documents obtained by WHMI through a Freedom of Information Act request indicated Nagle received seven disbursements made from the Veterans Services Relief Fund to either himself or his law firm between May of 2016 and February of 2017 totaling $4,900. While the payments were ostensibly for veteran-related legal representation, they raised questions about the propriety of a committee member receiving payments approved by a committee that he sits on. Smiddy’s position was recently filled by Mary Durst of Brighton, a Coast Guard veteran, whose appointment by the committee was unanimously ratified earlier this month by the Livingston County Board of Commissioners. (JK)

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    Intermittent freeway ramp closures can be expected in Genoa Township at the I-96/Latson Road interchange. Both the eastbound and westbound I-96 ramps at Latson Road were closed on Tuesday, to the surprise of some motorists. The Michigan Department of Transportation is performing warranty work that was expected to go through this Sunday, December 2nd. M-DOT Spokesman Aaron Jenkins tells WHMI crews are removing and replacing the concrete pavement on the ramps where cracks are present. However, since the weather took a turn, he says they are going to evaluate whether to complete this next week or wait till next year. As for now, the closures are still scheduled to be intermittent but weather dependent. (JM)

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    An upcoming recruitment open house aims to attract future volunteers to assist local first responders when called out to house fires and other disasters. The Livingston County Disaster Assistance Response Team or DART is an all-volunteer, independent organization committed to the health and well-being of local first responders on scene. DART has been in operation since 2012 and volunteers assist local law enforcement agencies, fire departments, EMS and other first responders. The team provides "canteen" services such as coffee, cold drinks, and snacks as well as "rehab" services that help keep them warm and dry in the cold winter months and cool and hydrated in the hot summer months. This Saturday, the Hamburg Township Fire Department will be hosting a recruitment open house for DART. Anyone with a desire to volunteer and give back can stop by the event to meet team members and learn what they do to assist first responders. The open house will run from 10am to noon at Station 12, located at 10100 Veterans Memorial Drive. More information about DART can be found through the link. An event flyer is attached. (JM)

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    Livingston County’s unemployment rate increased slightly from September to October. Livingston County’s October unemployment rate stood at 3.3% - up from 2.9% in September. Livingston’s ranking among Michigan’s 83 counties dropped five spots to 16th. Regional unemployment rates ranged from 2.6% to 4.6%, with ten regions recording rates below that of the state’s at 3.8%. Jason Palmer, director of the Bureau of Labor Market Information & Strategic Initiatives, says regional labor market trends were steady in October. He says jobless rates showed little change, while payroll employment rose in the majority of labor market areas. Both workforce levels and total employment advanced over the month in most Michigan regions. (JM)

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    Howell Public Schools is helping educate parents on the warning signs of depression in children with a special event next week. When Stephanie Harris, of Howell, and her husband lost their son Ethan to suicide last year, Harris said it threw them into “a pit of heart-hurt like no other.” Now, she’s working with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) to make sure no parent goes what she went through, and no student feels the hopelessness her son did. The AFSP, this coming Tuesday at 6pm, will be at the Howell High School Rod Bushey Performing Arts Center with their program, More Than Sad: Suicide Prevention for Parents. At the event, Steve Windham, who is the Michigan Director for the ASFP, will speak on depression signs and what to look for in a student who may be suffering. He will provide tools and strategies for starting a conversation with your children, and give examples of indicators that parents might not always see. Harris has worked with this program before and said the response has been real positive. Parents can come in, ask questions 1-on-1 with an expert, and leave with a greater confidence in going home and opening a conversation with their kids. This program is best suited for parents of middle and high school students, but anyone can attend. While Tuesday night’s event is ultimately aimed at educating parents, Howell Public Schools is also working with the AFSP to reach out to students and teachers. Earlier this year, students attended an AFSP event on teen depression and how to recognize signs in themselves and their friends. On December 7, middle school and high school teachers will participate in a More Than Sad event which will focus on recognizing mental health condition, warning signs of suicide, and steps they can take to help at-risk students. (MK)

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    A man who rolled his car in Tyrone Township was arrested after he attempted to flee the scene and got into a scuffle with a Livingston County Sheriff’s deputy. A deputy was dispatched to the area of northbound US-23 near Clyde Road in Hartland Township just after 3:30pm for a report of a minivan ramming another vehicle. Both vehicles were reported to have continued north on US-23 toward White Lake Road. A short time later the deputy spotted the minivan and attempted to stop the vehicle. However, the driver fled eastbound on White Lake Road to try and elude the deputy, but then ran off the roadway, drove through several yards and mailboxes, before striking a DTE power pole and overturning in the front yard of a residence near Carmer Road. The suspect resisted the deputy’s attempts to arrest him, including using a Taser to no effect, but was finally taken into custody with the assistance of Michigan State Police. The suspect and deputy were later transported to the St. Joe Livingston hospital for their injuries. The deputy was treated and released while the suspect remained hospitalized and is expected to face charges of Fleeing and Eluding, Resisting and Obstructing as well as assaulting a police officer once released. The Sheriff's Office was assisted on the scene by Livingston EMS, Michigan State Police, Fenton City Police Department as well as Fenton Fire Department. (JK)

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